The Power of Peer Support: Reducing Social Isolation in Residential Care Settings

 

Click Image to Download Poster

This project is a collaboration between The Bruyère Centre for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care; Bruyère Continuing Care; Carleton University; and Java Group Programs.

 

This funding allows recreation staff from Ontario long-term care homes to attend a full-day workshop and receive a Java Program licence completely FREE OF CHARGE (wage backfill and long-distance travel assistance are available).  Java Music Club and Java Memory Care are standardized peer-support group programs that can be implemented across the full spectrum of care.  The Java programs aim to reduce the stigma associated with support groups by reflecting a warm social setting, incorporating coffee and music.  These evidence-based peer support programs help reduce social isolation and loneliness!

 

 

Click on the links below to learn more.  The application deadline is October 31, 2017.

 

Timmins Workshop (November 27, 2017)

 

Kingston Workshop (November 30, 2017)

 

This three-part webinar series will deepen the knowledge and skills of participants who work and deal with staff performance, conflict, and complaint situations in long-term care. This series will be of value to those leaders or managers wishing to deepen their understanding of destructive workplace behaviours and their impacts. It will provide new thinking and applied methods that can help turn around unhealthy workplace environments so people can thrive, grow, and contribute. It’s about building a workplace culture for desired outcomes.

 

The workshops will be presented by Mary-Lou van der Horst, RN, MScN, MBA, Schlegel-University of Waterloo Research Institute for Aging (RIA).


COACHING FOR PERFORMANCE: UNDERSTANDING THE MEANING OF WORK

 

November 27, 2017 (1:00 PM – 2:30 PM)

 

Examine workplace performance and how workplaces can promote people to do their best or erode human potential. Explore the importance of meaning in our work and understanding that people come to work not only with hands but also with hearts, minds, and spirits.


CONFLICT MANAGEMENT: TURNING WORKPLACE CONFLICT INTO OPPORTUNITY

 

January 22, 2018 (1:00 PM – 2:30 PM)

 

Explore the basis of why teams become dysfunctional. Examine ways to resolve workplace conflict through positive and opportunistic actions. 


COMPLAINTS: FINDING THE VALUE IN THIS GIFT

 

February 26, 2018 (1:00 PM – 2:30 PM)

 

Explore workplace complaints and why they always seem to land on your doorstep. Examine how to make each complaint be a gift for improving workplace relationships.


To register for this FREE webinar series, please contact:

Regina Dryngiewicz at rdryngiewicz@conestogac.on.ca or 519-748-5220 ext. 3635

 

Participants who attend all three webinars will receive a Conestoga College Certificate of Attendance.

 

La version française suit

 

WATERLOO, Ont. (Monday October 2, 2017) The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC) has announced a Personal Support Worker (PSW) Training Fund to support the delivery of care to residents in Long-Term Care (LTC).

 

For the fiscal year 2017/18, MOHLTC is working with the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in LTC to coordinate PSW continuing education and training through the delivery of the “Excellence in Resident-Centred Care” (ERCC) program in partnership with Conestoga College. ERCC has been developed to help long-term care teams achieve Better Care and Better Outcomes using a person-centred, train-the-trainer approach that emphasizes ministry standards and the latest evidence to support care through the following 12 training modules:

 

  1. Person-centred care
  2. Infection Prevention and Control
  3. Safety and Mobility
  4. Oral Care and Skin Integrity
  5. Continence
  6. Nutrition and Hydration
  7. Delirium, Dementia and Depression
  8. Pain and Comfort
  9. Palliative/End-of-Life Care
  10. Self-Care
  11. Working with Others
  12. Observational Assessment

 

Watch the ERCC trailer here.

 

The objective of the PSW Training Fund is to help develop and enhance the PSW workforce in LTC to deliver high-quality and safe care that meets resident needs through continuing education and professional development. The fund aims to help LTC homes train a critical mass of PSWs and sustain ongoing learning that will continue to benefit LTC residents.

 

The PSW Training Fund will cover tuition and backfill for PSWs from Ontario LTC homes participating in ERCC Trainer Recertification, ERCC Trainer Certification, and ERCC Team Member Training from October 2, 2017 to March 30, 2018.

 

Each PSW who successfully completes the ERCC Trainer or ERCC Team Member course will receive a certificate issued by Conestoga College and the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging. Organizations with at least 70% of PSWs trained will receive an organization certificate jointly issued by Conestoga College and the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging.

 

Application opens October 2, 2017 at http://www.pswfundltc.ca

 

For more information about the PSW Training Fund, contact:

Chelsea White – Lead, PSW Training Fund for LTC

Schlegel Centre for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care

Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging

info@pswfundltc.ca

 

Media Contact

Hilary Dunn

Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging

hadunn@uwaterloo.ca

519-904-0660 ext. 4104

 


 

Subvention du gouvernement ontarien aux centres d’apprentissage, de recherche et d’innovation en soins de longue durée pour la formation des préposés aux soins personnels

 

Waterloo (Ontario), le 2 octobre 2017. — Le ministère de la Santé et des Soins de longue durée (MSSLD) a annoncé l’octroi de fonds de formation pour les préposés aux services de soutien à la personne afin de soutenir la prestation de soins aux résidents des soins de longue durée.

 

Durant l’année financière 2017-2018, le MSSLD travaillera avec les centres d’apprentissage, de recherche et d’innovation en SLD de l’Ontario pour coordonner les activités de formation continue des PSP par l’intermédiaire du programme Excellence des soins axés sur les résidents, en collaboration avec le Collège Conestoga. Le programme d’excellence a été mis sur pied pour aider les équipes oeuvrant en soins de longue durée à offrir de meilleurs soins pour obtenir de meilleurs résultats par une approche de formation des formateurs axée sur la personne qui vient renforcer les normes du ministère et les plus récentes données probantes en matière de soutien à la personne en douze modules de formation :

 

  1. Soins axés sur la personne
  2. Prévention et contrôle des infections
  3. Sécurité et mobilité
  4. Soins buccodentaires et intégrité de la peau
  5. Continence
  6. Nutrition et hydratation
  7. Délirium, démence et dépression
  8. Douleur et confort
  9. Soins palliatifs et de fin de vie
  10. Autosoins
  11. Travailler avec les autres
  12. Évaluation par l’observation

 

Visionnez la bande-annonce du programme d’excellence ici. L’objectif du fonds de formation des PSP vise à développer et à accroître la main-d’oeuvre chez cette catégorie de travailleurs en SLD par la formation continue et le perfectionnement professionnel pour assurer une prestation de soins sécuritaire et de haute qualité qui répond aux besoins des résidents. Les fonds aideront les foyers de SLD à former une masse critique de PSP et de maintenir une formation continue qui profitera aux résidents des SLD.

 

Le fonds de formation des PSP couvrira les frais d’étude et le détachement du personnel des foyers participants au programme Excellence des soins axés sur les résidents pour certifier ou recertifier les formateurs et les membres de l’équipe de formation du 2 octobre 2017 au 30 mars 2018.

Chaque PSP qui réussira le cours de formation du formateur ou du membre de l’équipe recevra un certificat délivré par le Collège Conestoga et l’Institut de recherche sur le vieillissement Schlegel-UW et il en va de même pour les organismes dont au moins 70 % de leurs PSP auront été formés.

 

Les demandes se prennent à compter du 2 octobre 2017 au http://www.pswfundltc.ca/.

 

Pour plus de renseignements sur le fonds de formation pour PSP, communiquez avec :

Chelsea White, agente de projets, Fonds de formation pour PSP

Centre d’apprentissage, de recherche et d’innovation pour les foyers de soins de longue durée Schlegel Institut de recherche sur le vieillissement Schlegel-Université de Waterloo

info@pswfundltc.ca

 

Contact pour les médias

Hilary Dunn

Institut de recherche sur le vieillissement Schlegel-Université de Waterloo

hadunn@uwaterloo.ca

519-904-0660, poste 4104

 

The newly re-funded Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation (CLRI) in Long-Term Care are looking to hire a Provincial Program Coordination.  The successful candidate will develop and implement a coordinated communication strategy for the CLRI to better serve as an integrated provincial resource to advance quality outcomes and quality of life in long-term care.

 

Please see the Call for Expressions of Interest to learn more.

The closing date is October 17, 2017.

 

Questions? Please review our responses to previously asked questions.

 

la version français suit

 

Ministry provides base funding for Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation

 

OTTAWA, TORONTO, WATERLOO, Ont. (Thursday August 17, 2017) – The Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation (CLRI) in Long-Term Care are pleased to announce a new substantial investment from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.  The base funding allocated to CLRI 2.0 will support continued development and spread of innovations to enhance quality of care across the Ontario long-term care sector.

 

Baycrest Health Sciences, Bruyère Research Institute and the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging will continue to jointly progress the CLRI 2.0 agenda across the province. A provincial advisory group will be established to guide all three Centres. The mandate of CLRI 2.0 will focus heavily on innovation in education, knowledge mobilization, applied research and quality improvement.

 

“We are delighted that the MOHLTC will continue to support Ontario’s Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in LTC. This commitment will enhance the education and expertise of staff in long-term care and create opportunities for students to develop skills and enthusiasm regarding the care of older adults,” says Dr. David Conn, Vice-President, Education & Director, Centre for Education at Baycrest Health Sciences.

 

“We are thankful for this investment as it will benefit Ontarians across the province by supporting education, innovation and linking research to practice in long-term care in both official languages,” says Heidi Sveistrup, Interim President and CEO at Bruyère Research Institute.

 

“With this substantial Ministry investment, research and innovation will be accelerated and shared to benefit long-term care homes across the province,” says Josie d’Avernas, Executive Director at Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging.

 

About the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research, and Innovation in Long-Term Care

In September 2011, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care established three Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation within the host organizations Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging, Bruyère Research Institute and Baycrest Health Sciences. The Ontario CLRIs enhance quality of care in the long-term care sector through education, research, innovation, evidence based service delivery and design, and knowledge mobilization. For more information visit www.clri-ltc.ca.

 

Logo of Baycrest Health Sciences                  logo of Bruyere Research Institute                 logo of Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging

 

Media Contacts

Jonathan MacIndoe
Baycrest Health Sciences (Toronto)
JMacIndoe@baycrest.org
416-785-2500 x 6579

Chantal Séguin
Bruyère Research Institute (Ottawa)
CSeguin@bruyere.org
613-562-6262 ext. 4024

Hilary Dunn
Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (Waterloo)
hadunn@uwaterloo.ca
519-904-0660 ext. 4104

 

 

Le ministère octroie un financement de base aux centres d’apprentissage, de recherche et d’innovation en Ontario

 

OTTAWA, TORONTO, WATERLOO,  le 17 août 2017. — Les centres d’apprentissage, de recherche et d’innovation (CARI) pour les foyers de soins de longue en Ontario sont heureux d’annoncer qu’ils ont reçu un financement substantiel du ministère de la Santé et des Soins de longue durée. Le financement de base alloué au CARI 2.0 appuiera le perfectionnement continu et la diffusion des innovations en matière d’amélioration de la qualité des soins de longue durée en Ontario.

 

Le Centre de la santé Baycrest, l’Institut de recherche Bruyère et l’Institut de recherche sur le vieillissement Schlegel-UW continueront de faire progresser le programme du CARI partout en province. Un comité consultatif provincial sera mis sur pied pour conseiller les trois centres. Le mandat du CARI 2.0 portera largement sur l’innovation dans le domaine de la formation, de la mobilisation du savoir, de la recherche appliquée et de l’amélioration de la qualité.

 

« Nous sommes ravis de savoir que le MSSLD continuera de soutenir les centres d’apprentissage, de recherche et d’innovation en SLD de l’Ontario. Cet investissement profitera au personnel des soins de longue durée par la formation et le perfectionnement qui seront offerts, et il sera aussi profitable aux étudiants qui ont des compétences à acquérir et qui sont enthousiastes à la perspective de donner des soins aux personnes âgées », explique le Dr David Conn, vice-président de la formation et directeur de la formation au Centre de la santé Baycrest.

 

« Nous sommes enchantés de cet investissement, car ce sont toutes les Ontariennes et tous les Ontariens qui en bénéficieront puisque les professionnels de la santé auront davantage de possibilités de formation, profiteront des concepts novateurs et pourront établir des liens entre la recherche et la pratique en soins de longue durée, et ce, dans les deux langues », ajoute Heidi Sveistrup, présidente-directrice générale intérimaire de l’Institut de recherche Bruyère.

 

Josie d’Avernas, directrice associée de l’Institut de recherche sur le vieillissement Schlegel-UW précise, quant à elle, que « Grâce à cet investissement substantiel du ministère, on pourra accélérer la recherche et l’innovation et diffuser les résultats pour en faire profiter tous les foyers de soins de longue durée en Ontario. »

 

À propos des Centres d’apprentissage, de recherche et d’innovation pour les foyers de soins de longue durée de l’Ontario

En septembre 2011, le ministère de la Santé et des Soins de longue durée de l’Ontario a créé trois centres d’apprentissage, de recherche et d’innovation, hébergés à même l’Institut de recherche sur le vieillissement Schlegel-UW, l’Institut de recherche Bruyère et le Centre de la santé Baycrest. En Ontario, les CARI œuvrent à l’amélioration de la qualité des soins de longue durée en appuyant la formation, la recherche, l’innovation, la prestation de service et la conception de programmes fondées sur des données probantes, et la mobilisation du savoir. Pour de plus amples renseignements, visitez le www.clri-ltc.ca.

 

logo of Baycrest Health Sciences                logo of Bruyere Research Institute                logo of Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging

Personnesressources pour les médias :

Jonathan MacIndoe
Baycrest sciences de la santé (Toronto)
JMacIndoe@baycrest.org
416-785-2500 x 6579

Chantal Séguin
Institut de recherche Bruyère (Ottawa)
CSeguin@bruyere.org
613-562-6262, poste 4024

Hilary Dunn
Institut de recherche sur le vieillissement Schlegel-UW (Waterloo)
hadunn@uwaterloo.ca
519-904-0660, poste 4104

 

 

 

Cycling has many benefits. It is a fun and liberating activity that is a great form of exercise, can be used as transportation and can help explore nature.

 

Cycling Without Age (CWA) is an innovative program that has helped seniors stay active and stay connected with their communities. CWA is making it possible for seniors or those with mobility challenges to get back on their bicycles and enjoy their communities and nature.

 

The brochure Cycling Without Age: Enhancing the Lives of Seniors. The Ottawa Experience shares the experiences of Saint-Louis Residence. It presents useful tools for other long-term care homes who are interested in setting up a volunteer-based cycling program for their residents.

 

For information on the CWA program go to cyclingwithoutage.com. Read some of the media coverage at Bruyére bike project gets seniors back in the saddle

 

 

For a copy of the brochure, please contact us at info@clri-ltc.ca

 

 

Image of brochure cover for Cycling Without Age, The Ottawa Experience, with the logos of Bruyere Research Institute and Bruyere Continuing Care

 

This is Long Term Care 2017 Conference: Ahead of the Curve

November 27-29, 2017

Westin Harbour Castle, Toronto

 

Call for Abstracts – The Ontario Long Term Care Association’s (OLTCA) This is Long Term Care 2017 conference profiles emerging research and innovation and successful quality initiatives in a unique forum designed for learning, networking and information sharing. It provides an unparalleled opportunity for our members to hear about cutting edge ideas as well as existing best practice programs that have tools, resources, policies and procedures which can be implemented across the sector.

 

CLICK HERE to review application criteria or to apply online.

 

The need to support Indigenous culture & cultural diversity in Ontario Long-Term Care homes

 

Canada’s population is getting more diverse. As our population ages, Long-Term Care homes will be expected to meet the growing needs of a culturally-diverse population.

 

Culture is ingrained in individual identity and affects life and health care practices, traditions, values and decision-making. In particular, Canada’s Indigenous people have unique cultural requirements. A legacy of colonization, historical trauma, racism, distrust of western medicine and ways, and sometimes geographic isolation, impact Indigenous people more than other segments of seniors. Respect for treaty rights and jurisdictional issues needs to be considered in planning for care and supporting the culture of this population.

 

 

Starting an inclusive, sector-wide reflection

 

As providers of person-centred care, Long-Term Care homes need to recognize and support the culture of their residents. This can sometimes be challenging, especially at a time when a resident’s health and mental capacity are declining. To help the sector learn about the approaches homes have used, and to understand the types of challenges homes have faced, Ontario’s CLRI Program spent several months in the past year gathering evidence and experiences from around the province.

 

We worked closely with multiple stakeholders and two Advisory Groups, and conducted a literature review. Our learnings will inform future work around developing tools and resources to support Indigenous culture and cultural diversity in Long-Term Care, and to scale-up existing, successful practices. Stakeholders underlined that any future activity must be in collaboration with various cultural and Indigenous groups, and with a broad range of healthcare providers.

 

 

Report: Supporting Indigenous Culture in Ontario’s Long-Term Care Homes

Report: Supporting Cultural Diversity in Ontario’s Long-Term Care Homes

 

Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) & brainXchange released a new report, Environmental Scan of Ontario’s Behavioural Support Transition Units (BSTUs). The report presents general information about the BSTUs for the purposes of learning, knowledge sharing, and quality improvement. 

 

In 2016, the Bruyère CLRI joined the BSTU Collaborative, which is part of Ontario’s Best Practice Exchange. The Collaborative designed and facilitated the environmental scan of Ontario’s BSTUs. Click here to learn more about the BSTU Collaborative and to access the report.

 

To contribute to the Collaborative, the Bruyère CLRI team drew on one of its past projects, Meeting Future Need Through Specialization in Long-Term Care Homes. This project focused on existing designated specialized units in Ontario’s long-term care homes. The designated units either wrap higher intensity care around residents with complex responsive behaviours, which are frequently related to dementia (BSTUs), or support the needs of residents who require dialysis.

 

To learn more about specialized units visit http://clri-ltc.ca/resource-category/specialized-units/ or read the article, Designated Specialized Units: How Ontario’s long-term care homes fill a gap in care, which was published in Healthcare Management Forum (October 2016).

 

 

Videos from the March 2017 Culture Change Exchange are now online!  Sessions from this event feature internationally-renowned speakers and presenters from Ontario’s long-term care sector, sharing how they’re enhancing the culture in their long-term care home or organization by building relationships and supporting people living with dementia.

 

For more information, visit the Research Institute for Aging website.