Author: Anil Gosai

New IPAC courses now available in French!

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has placed a spotlight on infection prevention and control (IPAC) in Ontario’s long-term care (LTC) homes. In Spring 2021, the Ontario CLRI at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA) released an IPAC resource page and eLearning series. We are happy to announce that new courses in our IPAC eLearning series are now available in French!

These eLearning courses focus on increasing IPAC knowledge and skills while empowering learners to protect themselves, residents, their co-workers, and their community. Learners will be able to apply their IPAC knowledge and skills to specific scenarios in LTC homes and situations they encounter in their communities.

“Our eLearning courses are based on situations that team members encounter in their work,” says Audra Thompson-Haile, Interim Director for the Ontario CLRI at the RIA. “This eLearning helps team members and essential care partners transfer IPAC knowledge to the care they provide.”

The eLearning courses we have available in our IPAC series in English and in French include:

 

  1. Break the Chain of Transmission: IPAC Core Concepts and Practices (prerequisite for the other courses in the IPAC eLearning series) – Also in French!
    • Types of Transmission and the Chain of Transmission
    • Additional Precautions and Routine Practices in Long-term Care
    • Applying Best Practices for Hand Hygiene and PPE
  2. IPAC While Supporting Residents at Mealtime
  3. IPAC While Traveling To and From an LTC Home
  4. IPAC While Administering Medication
  5. IPAC While Supporting Residents with Personal Care: Peri-Care, Continence Care and Using the Toilet
  6. IPAC While Supporting Residents  with Personal Care: Bathing, Dressing, and Grooming

Visit the IPAC in LTC page.

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The IPAC in LTC courses and training materials have been developed by the Ontario CLRI at the RIA in collaboration with an expert panel of IPAC specialists working in LTC and an advisory panel of LTC team members, essential care partners, and The Ontario Caregiver Organization.

Hear from students about their virtual interprofessional internships!

 

For the past two summers, the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) at Baycrest has hosted several cohorts of the Interprofessional Student Internships in Innovation and Aging.

In response to the pandemic, this virtual 4-week summer program was adapted from an in-person format. Two cohorts per year, each comprising up to 10 students are selected through a competitive application process. Interns are immersed in a variety of online programming to enhance their knowledge of geriatrics and to develop valuable communication skills for future careers in long-term care (LTC).

“This was a great internship and I appreciate the hard work that went into creating this online format and ensuring a high level of education and efficient execution. Thank you for this experience!” —Intern, 2022

The interns apply principles of empathy, problem framing and ideation to internship activities while collaborating with peers, subject matter experts, persons with lived experience and residents in LTC. By engaging with an Interprofessional Team, students expand their network of healthcare professionals, experience mentorship, and witness the value of collaboration between each role in LTC.

Experiential activities provide an engaging environment during the internship. Some of these activities include facilitated sessions and a meta-simulation game world that combines simulated cases, eLearning, the SOS Seniors Care Game and other online activities through the Learning Inter-Professionally Healthcare Accelerator (LIPHA). 

As a capstone project, interns develop an innovative solution that promotes social connectedness in LTC. By learning and applying innovative design thinking strategies, the project facilitates learning in the analysis of a practical issue and ideation of sustainable solutions. A resident-to-resident pen pal program, personalized sensory experiences, intergenerational activities, and a cultural showcase are just some of the solutions our interns have developed.

Interns prepare and present their solutions to an expert panel of Baycrest executives, educators and resident caregivers in the form of a concise and persuasive storyboard. By sharing and receiving feedback from this panel, collaborative relationships and implementation opportunities beyond the internship are formed. 

“I think this internship is an amazing opportunity for students to gain professional skills and knowledge that is applicable to any setting in health care. I hope to use these skills to be a health advocate for the geriatric population in my future career.” —Intern, 2022

Check out this video to hear from students about their experience in the Interprofessional Student Internship in Innovation and Aging.

 

Celebrating over 10,000 Person-Centred Language pledges!

Please join us in the celebration of having reached over 10,000 Person-Centred Language pledges!

Last summer, we reached our goal of 5,000 Person-Centred Language (PCL) pledges from health care providers and persons with lived experience to commit to changing the way we interact with and refer to people living with dementia and other complex mental health conditions. We are pleased to announce that as of September 17, 2022, we have doubled that number and now have over 10,316 pledges! We wish to recognize everyone who reviewed our commitment statements posters, signed our pledge, and encouraged colleagues, co-residents, family and friends to do the same.

Reaching 10,000 pledges marks an important milestone for the PCL Initiative which is co-led by the Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) Provincial Coordinating Office at the North Bay Regional Health Centre and the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research & Innovations in Long-Term Care (CLRI) at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA). Since its launch in 2017, The goal of the PCL Initiative has been to develop a set of commitment statements and associated products to inspire language choices that are appropriate, respectful, life-affirming and inclusive when interacting with and referring to individuals who communicate via responsive behaviours/personal expressions associated with dementia, complex mental health, substance use and/or other neurological conditions, as well as their partners in care.

If you have not yet signed our PCL pledge, it’s not too late! Fill out your pledge and download your certificate today at www.behaviouralsupportsontario.ca/pledge

I’ve completed my pledge, what can I do next?

Complete the e-course

The back-to-school season is the perfect time to complete our PCL eCourse. Available in English and French, this FREE eCourse demonstrates how PCL can have a positive impact on communication, care, and help to reduce stigma and discrimination (45min).

Explore examples

Check out our Word Swap Poster for ideas on how to incorporate PCL in your everyday conversations.

Receive a free Commitment Pledge Poster

Get in touch

Tell us how you’ve incorporated the PCL initiative in your organization by e-mailing us at provincialBSO@nbrhc.on.ca

Thank you for your commitment to the PCL Initiative!

 

Research Institute for Aging logo

New eLearning course on fall prevention released

The Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA) has released a new Orientation course: Preventing Falls in Long-Term Care. This course is available at no cost to support new and existing team members in fulfilling Ministry of LTC’s training requirements.

 

Falls can result in serious injury, hospital admission, and long-term loss of mobility and function. By taking this course, team members will learn, at their own pace, appropriate awareness and corresponding actions to take to effectively prevent falls and keep residents safe. Two versions are available: one for non-clinical team members and one for clinical team members.

 

Visit our eLearning course for clinical team members

Visit our eLearning course for non-clinical team members

 


LTC homes can now use LIPHA to boost retention & team competency

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you looking for innovative, interactive, and effective ways to train team members in your long-term care (LTC) home?

Do you want to improve the capacity and competency, and inspire the relational care of your LTC team?

If so – we’d like to introduce you to LIPHA– a free virtual learning platform designed by LTC for LTC. The Learning Inter-Professionally Healthcare Accelerator (LIPHA) is a simulation, coaching and community platform that provides a virtual space with simulated cases and a serious educational game for teams and individuals to practice caring for virtual residents.

“[The game] helps me [in] my study, both the practical and the theory. It gives me those theoretical answers or theoretical knowledge and basis on the older adults. And then it also gives me the edge of learning the skills that I need in my placement or in my practicum.”  – Student

We want to support LTC homes to incorporate LIPHA into their orientation and training at no cost. Supports include some backfill funding (first-come, first served) and access to technical, implementation, education support to assist the rollout of LIPHA.

Interested? Learn more and fill out our intake form, and stay tuned for more educational offerings.

 

Residents’ Voices – OARC needs your help!

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The Ontario Association of Residents’ Councils (OARC) has launched a survey to explore the current needs of Residents’ Councils and learn more about how residents are involved in their long-term care homes. In addition to hearing directly from residents, OARC is seeking the invaluable feedback of those who directly support and enable Residents’ Councils in every home. Results from the survey will be used to inform OARC’s supportive approach and future education offerings.

This survey is resident-focused, and open to:

  • All residents (including those who do not attend Residents’ Council meetings)
  • Residents’ Council Assistants
  • Administrators/Executive Directors

The assistance of family care partners, team members and volunteers is sincerely appreciated to ensure that every resident who wishes to complete a survey is supported to do so.  OARC’s survey will be live until June 20th, 2022 and each entry will be eligible to win a $50 gift card prize.

Complete your survey online here.  Printable survey version available here.

Requests to complete a survey over the phone may be directed to OARC team member Chloe Lee at 1-800-532-0201 ext. 290 or by email clee@ontarc.com.

Promotional posters to post in your long-term care home available here.

Additional information about our survey can be found in our recent bulletin.

English Survey

French Survey

New IPAC eLearning course released

"IPAC while supporting residents with bathing, dressing and grooming"

The COVID-19 pandemic has placed a spotlight on infection prevention and control (IPAC) in Ontario’s long-term care (LTC) homes. In Spring 2021, the Ontario CLRI at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA) released an IPAC resource page and eLearning series.

Now we have added to the eLearning series with a new course: IPAC While Supporting Residents with Personal Care: Bathing, Dressing, and Grooming.

 

 

“Our eLearning courses are based on situations that team members encounter in their work,” says Audra Thompson-Haile, Interim Director for the Ontario CLRI at the RIA. “This eLearning helps team members and essential care partners transfer IPAC knowledge to the care they provide.”

The new eLearning course focuses on using IPAC best practices while assisting residents with personal care, such as bathing, dressing and grooming. It will increase IPAC knowledge and skills while empowering learners to protect themselves, residents, their co-workers, and community members. 

With the IPAC resource page and eLearning series, learners will be able to apply their IPAC knowledge and skills to specific scenarios in LTC homes and situations encountered in the community.

eLearning courses now available

  • 1. Break the Chain of Transmission: IPAC Core Concepts and Practices (prerequisite for the other courses in the IPAC eLearning series) – Also in French!
    • Types of Transmission and the Chain of Transmission
    • Additional Precautions and Routine Practices in Long-term Care
    • Applying Best Practices for Hand Hygiene and PPE
  • 2. IPAC While Supporting Residents at Mealtime – Also in French!
  • 3. IPAC While Travelling To and From an LTC Home – Also in French!
  • 4. IPAC While Administering Medication
  • 5. IPAC While Supporting Residents with Personal Care: Peri-Care, Continence Care and Using the Toilet
  • 6. IPAC While Supporting Residents  with Personal Care: Bathing, Dressing, and Grooming

Visit the IPAC in LTC page


The IPAC in LTC courses and training materials have been developed by the Ontario CLRI at the RIA in collaboration with an expert panel of IPAC specialists working in LTC and an advisory panel of LTC team members, essential care partners, and The Ontario Caregiver Organization.

Are medical students ready to lead the change in long-term care?

"student reflections on a LTC research project"

By Ammar Saad.

During some of the darkest months of the past two years, most Canadians heard the grim news coming from long-term care (LTC) homes, and many witnessed first-hand the heartbreaking and devastating impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lives and wellbeing of LTC home residents and their families. 

As students, we wanted to help, but many of us didn’t know how. LTC homes were “locked-down” and we were “locked-out”. We also lacked the training and experience needed to provide long-term care, so we decided to learn through experiment, gain experience through research, and start by shedding light on the health inequities of LTC home residents during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

We formed a research team of medical, nursing, science, epidemiology, and public health students. We designed a research study to explore how the initial lockdown impacted LTC home residents’ lives, and if the visitation strategies that followed were of any help. With the supervision of a frontline physician who had expertise in long-term care, and support from the Ontario Centre for Learning, Research, and Innovation in Long-Term Care at Bruyère, we were ready to undertake an adventure of a lifetime, one that would ultimately shape our perspectives and careers. 

Our project entailed surveying and virtually interviewing LTC home residents, their family members, and designated caregivers. We believed that one-on-one interviews would allow residents and family members to speak their minds and tell us about their experiences and stories candidly and safely. For some of us, this was not our first research study collaboration, but for all of us, it was the first time that we had the opportunity to hear real-life stories and experiences in LTC homes during the pandemic. Residents and their families had a lot to say, their words were emotionally charged, their stories laden with anger, despair, guilt, and confusion. We felt what they felt, ached as they ached, and at certain points, could not believe what we had heard.

This was a challenging time for everyone, including us, students, who were navigating a changing education system, coping with COVID-19 stress, and trying to see this research study through. While many argued that we did not have the capacity to take on an emotionally charged study such as ours, we found solace in what this adventure brought to us and what it would bring to the scientific community for years to come. Through this study, we found a purpose and cause to fight for, a channel to streamline our efforts, and an opportunity to expand on what health equity means in long-term care and COVID-19. We were and still are, confident that the stories we heard and experiences of residents and family members that we documented, coupled with our robust approach to research will shed light on an understudied issue; the health inequities experienced by LTC home residents. Our findings can serve as the first step towards making sure that LTC home residents never have to experience the same inequities they have ever again.

So where do we go from here?” we asked ourselves as we submitted the research paper for publication earlier this year. We are now equipped with the experimental knowledge we need to shape our careers and support equitable and evidence-based care to LTC home residents, but how about other students who were not able to share this opportunity with us? Our work cannot be exclusive to our team or it will defy its purpose and objective. All and every student with the desire to learn more about the health inequities brought by the COVID-19 pandemic to LTC home residents should have the opportunity to do so. Our next step going forward will be to lead the way for other students to learn as we learned and shape their careers as we did. We now have the duty to lead the change. Through advocating for the integration of long-term care education into our undergraduate and graduate curricula, and through working with our respective university programs to create new initiatives, such as community service-learning programs, we can provide students the opportunity to care for and improve the health equity of LTC home residents. We are now ready to lead the change in long-term care. The real question remains: who is willing to help us lead this change?

Learn more about our study, and our protocol

Ammar Saad is a medical student who pursued a master’s degree in Epidemiology from the University of Ottawa. He is the lead author on the aforementioned research paper, Health Equity Implications of the COVID-19 Lockdown and Visitation Strategies in Long-Term Care Homes in Ontario: A Mixed Method Study