Author: AJ Adams

Cooking Competition Sparks New Favourites for LTC Menus

Winner of the Savoury Category

Ready, set, bake!

The Ontario CLRI at the RIA hosted a cooking competition as part of the Nutrition in Disguise (NiD) project on Saturday, March 7.

Students from Conestoga College’s School of Hospitality & Culinary Arts competed to create nutritionally rich recipes using key  ingredients to help fight malnutrition in long-term care homes. Most older adults don’t eat enough nutrients to stay healthy. The NiD project focuses on creating nutrient-dense recipes by adding healthy ingredients to common foods that older adults enjoy: think lentils in brownies, or wheat germ in apple muffins.

The competition will help us build a library of recipes that long-term care homes can work in to their menus without breaking their budget.

Contestants competed to win one of two $500 prizes for the best NiD Recipe in one of two categories: 1) Sweet: desserts, snacks and puddings, and 2) Savoury: spreads, soups, breakfast protein. Recipes were created using a specific pre-determined nutrient-dense ingredient to enhance nutrition. Winners from each category received $500 and the title of the best student NiD recipe!

The NiD project is part of Professor Heather Keller’s research at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging. The Ontario CLRI is partnering with Prof. Keller to develop nutrition tools for long-term care homes based on the study findings.

The recipes were tasted and reviewed by a panel of judges: 

  • Heather Keller, Research Chair in  Nutrition and Aging, Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging;
  • Residents from Schlegel Villages;
  • Chef George Madalena, Schlegel Villages; and,
  • Lisa Duizer, University of Guelph’s Food Science Department.

The winners 

Savoury 

Hannah Nguyen for her Secret Glazed Tofu Sandwich recipe

Sweet 

Ishika Goyal for her Black Bean Brownie with Silken Tofu Chocolate Mousse recipe

Photo Gallery 

We’re Hiring: Engagement and Event Assistant

Engagement and Event Assistant

Competition: 19-BRI-25
Program: Bruyère Research Institute
Position Type: Full-Time, 37.5 hrs/week, 1.0 FTE – Until March 31, 2021, with the possibility of extension
Salary Scale: $24.46 – $27.89 per hour, commensurate with experience
Start Date: 2020/01/30 15:00
Closing Date: 2020/02/12 23:59
Job Location: Saint-Louis Residence (Orleans)

 

The Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) support long-term care (LTC) homes to improve the quality of life and care for residents through building capacity and promoting innovative best practices among LTC homes in Ontario. We engage with people connected with the LTC sector. The Ontario CLRI is funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Long-Term Care and is hosted by Baycrest Health Sciences in Toronto, Bruyère in Ottawa, and Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging in Waterloo.

The Ontario CLRI at Bruyère is seeking an experienced, preferably bilingual, Event and Engagement Assistant to support the team in the delivery of projects and outreach activities. These responsibilities include assisting with the implementation of knowledge mobilization activities and events, communicating with a variety of project partners, including long-term care homes, sector stakeholders and the Ontario CLRI teams at Baycrest and Schlegel-UW RIA, and drafting outreach documents, integrating comments and disseminating the final documents to different audiences.

This position will require teamwork, flexibility, attention to detail, initiative, creativity, judgment, as well as problem-solving and time management skills to address non-routine tasks. This position is a wonderful opportunity for growth in a dynamic and fast-paced environment. This role will involve some travel in Ontario.

Main duties and responsibilities:

Engagement and Outreach Support – 50%

  • Setting appointments/meetings for multiple stakeholders – with teams in the Ontario CLRI, within the Bruyère Research Institute (BRI), and with LTC sector stakeholders for outreach and knowledge sharing.
  • Preparing, editing and formatting correspondence, communications, presentations and reports.
  • Assisting with the preparation of complex documents (e.g., quarterly/annual reports, strategic plans, communication and marketing materials, including web writing).

Meeting / Event Planning – 30 %

  • Supporting various committees; including scheduling, logistics and AV set-up, agenda preparation, meeting attendance and minute taking.
  • Assisting event planning; including both teleconference meetings and webinars, event promotion, preparation of participant packages, coordination of all logistics.
  • Organizing registration, travel arrangements and accommodations for events and functions.
  • Representing the Ontario CLRI at for sector events through set up and running of an Ontario CLRI vendor booth.

Financial Support – 10%

  • Prepare payment requisitions and other forms for approval and submission.
  • Tracking and/or inputting financial report data as assigned, reconcile accounts each month.
Project Administrative Support – 10%
  • Communicate with stakeholders and project teams, as appropriate, to share and obtain information for project promotion, reporting and other purposes.
  • Assist with research project tasks, such as participant recruitment, data collection, coordinating logistics, literature searches, submissions of grant proposals and manuscripts, tracking of activities.
This job description is not exhaustive. Additional duties may be added as the projects progress.

Qualifications

  • University or college level training preferred.
  • Three or more years relevant experience in event coordination, communications and engagement or research.
  • Comfortable working with numbers. Experience in accounts payable/receivable would be an asset.
  • Proficiency with Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Project & Publisher) with preference given to candidates with high or advanced skills in Excel.
  • Highly motivated, detail oriented individual with the ability to multi-task, prioritize, and meet tight deadlines within a high demand environment.
  • Self-directed and able to effectively work both independently and as part of a team (primarily with those based in Ottawa but also with Ontario CLRI teams in Toronto and Waterloo).
  • Experience in data entry and data cleaning.
  • Experience in organizing and supporting events, face-to-face meetings, and conference calls and webinars; scheduling, minute-taking, webinar management.

Desirable Competencies

  • Experience working and/or education and professional development in the long-term care sector.
  • Ability to prioritize multiple tasks and meet deadlines.
  • Excellent analytical and organizational skills, including the ability to adapt to a dynamic project environment.
  • Ability to communicate in French with internal and external partners.
BRI welcomes and encourages applications from people with disabilities. Accommodations are available on request for candidates taking part in all aspects of the selection process.
If you are interested in this opportunity please submit your cover letter and resume to
BRI-HR@bruyere.org
no later than February 12, 2020. 
We thank you for your interest in this position, however; only those chosen for an interview will be contacted.

We’re Hiring: Knowledge Broker

Knowledge Broker /Project Coordinator

Competition: 19-BRI-24
Program: Bruyère Research Institute
Position Type: Full-Time, 37.5 hrs/week, 1.0 FTE – Until March 31, 2021, with the possibility of extension
Salary Scale: $31.84 – $36.30 per hour, commensurate with experience
Start Date: 2020/01/21 12:45
Closing Date: 2020/02/03 23:59
Job Location: Saint-Louis Residence (Orleans)

 

The Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) build capacity through innovation and collaboration in education, research, and knowledge mobilization. The Program’s goal is to support long-term care homes to improve the quality of life and care for residents through building capacity and promoting innovative best practices. The Ontario CLRI works with stakeholders to support research, develop innovative education, and share resources with LTC homes. We engage with people connected with the LTC sector.

The Ontario CLRI is funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and is hosted by Baycrest Health Sciences, Bruyère, and Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging.

The Knowledge Broker / Project Coordinator at the Ontario CLRI at Bruyère will be responsible for developing, implementing and supporting knowledge mobilization activities and for the development and delivery of blended learning opportunities that build on research and evidence-based innovations. These learning opportunities will support sustainable practice change, will be learner-centered and will be tailored to meet the needs of stakeholders in long-term care.

The Ontario CLRI at Bruyère Knowledge Broker / Project Coordinator will be responsible for the oversight of day-to-day project development and operations, in collaboration with the CLRI manager and team. These responsibilities include substantial independent communication and coordination with a variety of project partners, including long-term care homes, content experts, eLearning designers and other technical contributors, and the Ontario CLRI teams at Baycrest and Schlegel-UW RIA; carrying out project work independently; providing oversight of other staff and the entire financial process (budgeting, forecasting, etc.); synthetizing and disseminating information to different audiences; and proactively connecting with the different users of CLRI tools and training to support their learning and practice change. The successful candidate must be able to exercise judgment, based upon their thorough knowledge of long-term care procedures, guidelines and regulations. This position will require a high level of collaboration and teamwork, and will involve some travel in Ontario.

Main duties and responsibilities:

Project planning and management – 50%

  • Work with the Ontario CLRI at Bruyère team to ensure a timely development of project and program deliverables; one focus will be on eLearning opportunities
  • Oversee the day-to-day activities of assigned projects with minimal supervision
  • Coordinate logistics for projects, including plans for data collection and analysis, financial planning and tracking, facilitate meetings, establish project schedules, timelines, milestones, contracts and resources

Knowledge Mobilization and Coordination Support – 50 %

  • Develop, implement and evaluate knowledge translation and transfer activities to advance CLRI program goals, particularly around eLearning and blended learning opportunities
  • Coordinate with other Ontario CLRI teams at Baycrest and Schlegel-UW RIA and contribute expertise to joint planning and activities
  • Correspond with external stakeholders and investigators
  • Work with the Ontario CLRI at Bruyère team to ensure a timely drafting and submission of publications, presentations and grants
This job description is not exhaustive. Additional duties may be added as the projects progress.

Required Competencies

Undergraduate degree in relevant fields, with experience in areas such as health, (Adult) Education, Communications, implementation research, innovation support, change management, knowledge translation.

  • Experience in training, particularly eLearning, including experience with techniques and methodologies of training needs assessment, program design (curriculum, learning activities, resources, strategies, plans and processes using various learning delivery models including online, blended, hybrid and classroom formats), delivery and evaluation, and demonstrated application of adult learning and eLearning principles.
  • Strong interpersonal skills and ability to work in a team environment and with multiple internal and external partners
  • Exceptional communication skills, including written and verbal (in English)
  • 3 years’ relevant project coordination experience

Desirable Competencies

  • Experience working and/or education and professional development in the Long-Term Care environment
  • Ability to prioritize multiple tasks, manage overlapping project phases and meet deadlines
  • Excellent analytical and organizational skills, including the ability to adapt to a dynamic project environment
  • Demonstrated ability to produce quality documentation and develop and design training materials for online courses, sessions, programs in accordance with Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards
  • Ability to communicate in French with internal and external partners

 

BRI welcomes and encourages applications from people with disabilities. Accommodations are available on request for candidates taking part in all aspects of the selection process.
If you are interested in this opportunity please submit your cover letter and resume to
BRI-HR@bruyere.org, no later than Monday, February 3, 2020. 
We thank you for your interest in this position, however; only those chosen for an interview will be contacted.

Take Our Kids to Work Day: An experiential learning opportunity

Students pose with team members from Bruyère’s Saint-Louis Residence during a presentation about occupation therapy.

On Wednesday, November 6, 2019, organizations across Canada welcomed high school students for Take Our Kids to Work Day. One of our own host organizations, Bruyère, took advantage of this day to expose teenagers to career in long-term care.

Bruyère welcomed children of employees to one of their long-term care homes, Saint-Louis Residence . The group got the day started with an orientation session and followed up with a visit of the home, during which the students had the opportunity to meet Bruyère’s professionals, to learn more about the employment possibilities in the LTC sector, and to participate in different activities with residents.

Take Our Kids to Work Day highlighted the fact that learning is far from limited to the classroom: It was an enriching day for the teens of Bruyère employees. The Ontario CLRI is proud to be working on this exact concept – experiential learning.

The Ontario CLRI has created Experiential Learning in Long-Term Care: A Guidebook for Building Partnerships Between Secondary Schools and Long-Term Care Homes, which supports LTC homes and secondary schools in establishing meaningful partnerships to create experiential learning placements for students. As a companion to the guidebook, the Ontario CLRI has assembled an Experiential Learning page, which offers additional resources to help plan and implement an experiential learning placement.

Did your LTC home host a Take Our Kids to Work event this year? We would love to hear and share your ideas – email us at info@clri-ltc.ca.

 

 

 

What is The Java Music Club (CFRA Radio Interview)

Smiling woman with drum sticks

What is the Java Music Club? Listen to Michelle Fleming, a knowledge broker from the Ontario Centre for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care at Bruyère and Renate Ysseldyk, an assistant professor at Carleton University in the Department of Health Sciences.

They talk about the Java Music Club, a program aimed at reducing loneliness and isolation among seniors in care homes, including Bruyère.

The Java Music Club is one of the peer support programs being studied through a collaborative research project. Members are encouraged to meet weekly, fostering camaraderie by sharing stories from their lives, discussing engaging topics, listening to music and supporting one another.

Renate Ysseldyk research focuses on the influence of psychosocial factors on the health and well-being of vulnerable populations—particularly seniors.

Click the play button below to listen to the interview.

 

What’s in Your Medicine Cabinet?

Using Deprescribing Tools and Resources to Optimize Seniors’ Medication Plans

As people age, their list of medications tends to grow. Two out of three Canadian seniors are on more than five prescription medications, while 40 per cent of Canadians over 85 are taking more than 10. Medications can provide effective care, but some may no longer be necessary and may be causing more harm than good.

Who hasn’t seen an older person with a cup in hand, filled with capsules of different size and color? The person may be able to recite the purpose of each medication; another may quietly grumble, “My doctor told me to take it, so I do.”

The engagement of patients and residents in carefully assessing their medication use is a necessary step to delivering quality care — this is where deprescribing comes in.

What is deprescribing?

pillsDeprescribing is the planned and supervised reduction or cessation of a medication that may be harmful or no longer beneficial. The Bruyère Deprescribing Guidelines Research Team and their international co-investigators have developed evidence-informed resources to assist healthcare professionals, educators, patients, residents and their caregivers. These resources support people in incorporating deprescribing into care plans and foster strong relationships between patients/residents and care providers.

Deprescribing resources contain five algorithms, which physicians, nurse practitioners and other prescribers can use to determine if a specific drug class is still the right choice and how it can be tapered or stopped. Infographics explain the drugs and their purpose in laymen’s terms. Videos provide detailed instructions on how to use the algorithms.
With the support of Ontario Centre for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care, the Deprescribing team at Bruyère is collaborating with long-term care (LTC) homes in Ottawa to implement the algorithms into regular care plans for their residents. Some of the initial research engaged LTC homes in the Ottawa area.

Feedback on the effectiveness of the existing tools and approaches from LTC homes will feed into plans for sustainably spreading scaling up deprescribing in the sector. Sustainable deprescribing is about teaching healthcare professionals the importance of deprescribing practices, while teaching patients and residents that it’s okay to ask questions about their medications.

Get started on stopping unnecessary medications in your LTC home

Bilingual resources to support deprescribing plans are available online at deprescribing.org.

 


Please note that this article first appeared in AdvantAge Ontario’s Action Update in October 2018.

Innovative Program Helps Reduce Loneliness in Long-Term Care

Residents enjoying Java Music Club

The Ontario Centre for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) at Bruyère developed a short documentary series to show the powerful impacts that peer support groups are having on people living in long-term care homes. Our team visited five homes across Ontario to film groups in action and interviewed residents, team members, managers, and researchers. View the video series below:

Over the last two decades, the tides in long-term care have been gradually shifting away from the traditional medical model towards a more social model of care, with the introduction of philosophies like the Eden Alternative, Green House Project, and the Butterfly Model. Despite many improvements, change is slow. Studies show that at least one out of two residents in long-term care homes experience loneliness. Loneliness has been linked to several negative health outcomes – among them depression, dementia, increased hospitalizations, impaired mental health and increased mortality. In fact, loneliness may be as damaging as smoking 15 cigarettes per day.

Although those living in long-term care are surrounded by people, they often report feeling alone. Often when someone moves into a long-term care home, it is following a crisis situation or major change in health, leading to an overwhelming sense of loss: loss of independence, loss of neighbours, loss of their home, sometimes also a loss of spouse. These losses can result in a profound sense of disconnection and social isolation. The Power of Peer Support project team has spent the past year aiming to reduce the impacts of these realities by supporting and researching meaningful peer support programs.

There is a growing body of research that documents the effectiveness of peer support in alleviating loneliness and depression. Peer support enables individuals to learn new ways of coping through identification with others in a similar position. Despite the known benefits of peer support groups for individuals with chronic illnesses, these programs have historically rarely been used in long-term care homes. The Java Group Programs developed a unique model to change this fact. Founded by Kristine Theurer, PhD, Java Group Programs are the first standardized peer support interventions designed to address the critical rates of depression and loneliness in senior living.

The Java Music Club is one of the peer support programs being studied through this collaborative research project. Members are encouraged to meet weekly, fostering camaraderie by sharing stories from their lives, discussing engaging topics, listening to music and supporting one another. The warm atmosphere offers residents the opportunity to unload burdens, learn new coping strategies, reminisce, and develop an increased sense of belonging. Java Memory Care is a vital adaptation for those living with moderate to advanced dementia. These groups are designed to be facilitated by staff, volunteers and/or family members.

“I consider myself very fortunate to have met [fellow Java Music Club members] and learn something about their life experiences,” explains Luella Lemaire, a resident at the Glebe Centre and member of the Java Music Club. “Sometimes we laugh, sometimes we cry, but most of all, we smile. We share lives.”

In 2018, a grant from the Centre for Aging + Brain Health Innovation brought the Java Music Club and Java Memory Care to 33 long-term care and 5 retirement homes across Ontario. Homes have engaged in robust training, including in-person workshops and webinars, covering a variety of topics related to effective group facilitation.

A portion of the grant also advances our understanding of the benefits of peer support for residents through rigorous research. Dr. Renate Ysseldyk from Carleton University’s Department of Health Sciences is leading the research team to understand and monitor both the social and health outcomes in selected homes. The team has been working closely with residents and staff at Élisabeth Bruyère Residence and Riverstone Retirement Communities to understand and document their experiences.

Throughout this project, the team has seen how these peer support group programs offer opportunities for residents to engage with peers in small group settings. Creating these atmospheres where residents are encouraged to open up about their emotions, and share details about themselves and their lives, facilitates powerful opportunities for deeper connections between residents, as well as with staff and volunteers who facilitate the program. Group facilitators have reported this experience to be a professionally enriching experience and volunteers have shared that it has been personally enriching for them. These groups offer a unique way of connecting residents about things that really matter to them personally, and opportunities for them to support one another.”

Loneliness is dangerous for our health, and presents a critical public health crisis, particularly amongst those within our population that are most vulnerable. The opportunity to connect with others meaningfully through peer support groups offers a promising potential antidote to loneliness.


The Power of Peer Support: Reducing Social Isolation in Residential Care project is a collaboration between the Ontario CLRI at Bruyère, Carleton University, Bruyère Continuing Care, and Java Group Programs. This project is funded by the Centre for Aging + Brain Health Innovation, Carleton University and the government of Ontario through the Ontario CLRI hosted at Bruyère. For further information about this project please click here.

Cycling Without Age

Enhancing the Lives of Seniors – The Ottawa Experience

What images come to mind when thinking about community? Strolling around, admiring the neighbors’ gardens, seeing children play, walking to work or to shops… These thoughts about a community are all related to enjoying the outdoor environment. What happens when someone is held back from enjoying this outdoor environment? The risk of isolation and loneliness grows.

As people age, their bodies often become frailer and their range of movement can become more restricted, making it much harder to get outdoors. This would cause isolation and loneliness in anyone, let alone the often frail people living in long-term care.

Recognizing the benefits, Therapeutic Support Services staff at Bruyère Continuing Care decided to look for ways to get residents outdoors. When the idea of of Cycling Without Age came about, they could not turn down the proposal.

Cycling Without Age bike taking residents in forest. What is Cycling Without Age?

Cycling Without Age (CWA) is an innovative program that helps seniors stay active and stay connected with their communities. Originating from Demark, CWA makes it possible for seniors or those with mobility challenges to get back on bicycles, allowing them to enjoy their scenic communities. This initiative started in 2012, and has expanded to 28 different countries.

CWA uses a special 3-wheeled rickshaw bike. These “trishaws” have a two-seater passenger carriage in the front. Volunteer “pilots” who sit on a bike in the back, propelling the bike forward. The bike pilot can easily chat with the passengers, often connecting people from different generations through conversation, storytelling, and reminiscing.

Cycling Without Age at Bruyère

Bruyère Continuing Care (Bruyère) opened Ontario’s first CWA chapter in 2016, in collaboration with community partner Gary Bradshaw. The Ontario Centre for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) at Bruyère supported the program evaluation. Bruyère runs two long-term care homes, Saint-Louis Residence and Élisabeth Bruyère Residence, and also operates the Bruyère Village for independent seniors’ living, all located in Ottawa.

Bruyère’s Therapeutic Support Services Department runs the CWA program at all of these sites, and has had tremendous success.

Senior in CWA bike overlooking Parliament.
In the first summer season of the program, the CWA program served 46 residents of Saint-Louis Residence, or 1 in 4 who live in the Residence, as well as 48 Bruyère Village tenants, family members and friends who accompanied residents on their outings. With such a high demand, over 121 hours were pedaled in that first summer alone. Alternating between more than 34 trained volunteer bike pilots, the average ride was 60 minutes long and each participating resident had an average of three rides in the warm summer months.

The first season was an overall success, with a 99% satisfaction rate. Participants commented on their enjoyment of the rides and the beauty of nature, bringing laughter and smiles as they waved at the neighbours passing them on the bike path and in the community. Pilots shared in that enjoyment, loving the exercise, nature, and discussions with new friends. The launch was similarly successful at Élisabeth Bruyère Residence in 2017, proving that this program can run in both homey suburban and busy urban settings.

Want More Information? Watch our Webinar!

Most recently, the Ontario CLRI hosted a webinar covering the CWA program. Presented by Kim Durst-Mackenzie (Therapeutic Recreation and Volunteer Coordinator, Bruyère) and Gary Bradshaw (Community Partner), the webinar focuses on the concept of CWA and why it is an essential program, as well as offers a more detailed explanation of the ins-and-outs of running CWA in long-term care homes with a large group of dedicated volunteers.

A program brochure is also available, outlining useful tool, policies, procedures, and evaluation approaches.

Shorter versions of this article can be found in AdvantAge Ontario’s July Action Update.

To view any of the resources listed above, please visit the CWA resource page.


This article draws on the findings of the evaluation of the first season of the Bruyère Cycling Without Age program, that was partially supported by the Government of Ontario through the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-term Care. Opinions expressed in this report do not necessarily reflect those of the Government of Ontario.

Fonds pour le cours sur La communication en fin de vie destiné aux soins de longue durée

This page is also available in English.


Les centres d’apprentissage, de recherche et d’innovation (CARI d’Ontario) pour les foyers de soins de longue durée de l’Ontario présentent :

FONDS POUR LE COURS SUR LA COMMUNICATION EN FIN DE VIE DESTINÉ AUX SOINS DE LONGUE DURÉE

Le ministère de la Santé et des Soins de longue durée de l’Ontario a donné aux CARI le mandat de coordonner la formation continue des préposés aux services de soutien à la personne (PSSP) sur l’amélioration des soins en fin de vie. Le Fonds pour le cours sur la communication en fin de vie offre La communication en fin de vie : atelier de formation des formateurs (première phase) et La communication en fin de vie : Formation des PSSP (deuxième phase) en collaboration avec le Collège Algonquin.

PREMIÈRE PHASE : ATELIERS DE FORMATION DES FORMATEURS

La première phase consiste en une série d’ateliers de deux jours visant à fournir aux formateurs en soins de longue durée (SLD) de l’Ontario des ressources éducatives pour enseigner aux PSSP en SLD des aptitudes à la communication en fin de vie et en soins palliatifs. Cent quatre foyers de SLD seront sélectionnés pour participer à la première phase. Chacun de ces foyers de SLD devra envoyer deux formateurs en SLD à une formation La communication en fin de vie : atelier de formation des formateurs. Les foyers de SLD seront admissibles à une subvention salariale et à une aide au déplacement pour permettre à leurs formateurs en SLD de participer à l’atelier en classe.

Tableau 1. Calendrier de La communication en fin de vie : atelier de formation des formateurs

LIEU DATES
London 4 et 5 octobre 2018
Hamilton 11 et 12 octobre 2018
Barrie  18 et 19 octobre 2018
Mississauga 18 et 19 octobre 2018
Peterborough 25 et 26 octobre 2018
Timmins 1 et 2 novembre 2018
Ottawa1 8 et 9 novembre 2018
Thunder Bay 8 et 9 novembre 2018

1 L’atelier à Ottawa se déroulera en français. Tous les autres altiers se dérouleront en anglais.

DEUXIÈME PHASE : FORMATION DES PSSP

35 foyers de SLD seront sélectionnés pour participer à la deuxième phase. Les 35 foyers de SLD doivent d’abord terminer la première phase avant de recevoir du soutien pour participer à la deuxième phase. Ces foyers de SLD recevront une formation structurée de quatre heures afin de soutenir leurs formateurs en SLD dans la prestation de la formation sur la communication en fin de vie aux PSSP. Les foyers de SLD seront admissibles à une subvention salariale pour leurs formateurs en SLD ainsi que pour un certain nombre de PSSP qui participent à la deuxième phase.

QUI EST ADMISSIBLE?

  • Seuls les foyers de SLD de l’Ontario sont admissibles au Fonds pour le cours sur la communication en fin de vie.
  • Chaque foyer de SLD de l’Ontario remplit une demande de fonds pour le cours sur la communication on fin de vie. L’administrateur du foyer de SLD doit remplir la demande. Les demandes incomplètes ne seront pas acceptées.

DATE LIMITE POUR PRÉSENTER LA DEMANDE : 31 août 2018, 23 h 59 (HE)

APPLIQUEZ :

Les applications pour cet atelier sont fermées pour le moment. Inscrivez-vous à notre newsletter pour les opportunités à venir.

Si vous avez des questions après avoir consulté les documents ci-dessus, veuillez communiquer avec nous à l’adresse CEOLFUND@bruyere.org ou nous appeler au 613-562-6262, poste 1985.

Pour obtenir des renseignements détaillés sur le Fonds pour le cours sur la communication en fin de vie, veuillez consulter les documents suivants :