Resource Audience Type: Educators

Dementia Simulation Toolkit

The Ontario CLRI at Baycrest develops and evaluates innovative educational approaches designed to enhance not only knowledge and skills, but also values and attitudes in learners. With the assistance of interprofessional summer interns, an initial dementia simulation was created and trialed. A final version is presented here in the form of a toolkit. The scripts and resources in this toolkit have evolved over time using a quality improvement approach and are meant to foster participant awareness and insight into living life with frailty and dementia.

This toolkit contains:

  • Information facilitators need to know regarding dementia and dementia
  • Simulation techniques and sample scenarios based on common experiences of the
    elderly in the healthcare system
  • Additional modifications for the scenarios
  • Ideas on how to structure the simulation session for an interprofessional audience,
    including the debrief

As a result, this toolkit will allow users to:

  •  Identify and utilize dementia simulation techniques and scenarios
  • Use these simulations to engage participants in reflection and develop a deeper
    understanding of dementia and frailty

Move to Trash

Dementia Simulation Toolkit 2.0

Developing Culturally Grounded Dementia Educational Materials for Indigenous Community-Based Care

About this Webinar

This webinar outlines the development of six culturally relevant fact sheets on dementia and dementia care that can be used by Indigenous family caregivers, health care providers, as well as other organizations interested in the promotion of dementia awareness and care in Indigenous communities. The fact sheets bridge essential biomedical knowledge deemed important to convey and Indigenous understandings and explanatory models of the illness. The development of culturally appropriate health promotion materials for Indigenous communities is not simply a cut and paste process where mainstream materials are adapted through changes to imagery but not meaning. Rather, the production of culturally-based materials requires grounding in Indigenous knowledge of specific illnesses and community based models of care.

This integrated webinar event is brought to you by brainXchange in partnership with the Alzheimer Society of Canada and the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA).

This webinar has been identified as a resource that supports Indigenous culture in long-term care by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle.

Saint Elizabeth First Nations, Inuit and Métis Program

About the Program

The Saint Elizabeth First Nations, Inuit and Métis Program provides virtual education at no cost to health care providers working in First Nation communities. Their national knowledge exchange network includes online courses, webinars, community forums and 24/7 access to peers and experts. They also partner with communities and organizations to better understand gaps and barriers to care and support improvements through action-based research.

This program has been identified as a resource that supports Indigenous culture in long-term care by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle.

Team Puzzle Activity

Teamwork, Leadership, Solution-Focus

 

This experiential learning activity is a low-fidelity simulation suitable for entry-level and advanced educators and simulationists. The purpose is to foster reflection and insight about teamwork, leadership and solution-focused problem-solving. The simulation typically lasts 3-5 minutes and at least 15 minutes should be allotted for pre-briefing and debriefing for up to 4 teams.

 

Preparation:
  1. For each group of 4-6 staff, one 24-piece puzzle is required. A clock is needed to time the activity.
  2. Remove and keep the puzzle box lids nearby so that the final picture isn’t known for each puzzle, remove one center piece (marked on the back to identify the puzzle it belongs to) and hide it nearby (e.g., on your person).
  3. For more than 1 group, ideally use multiples of the same puzzle, removing the same puzzle piece from each one.

 

Activity Instructions:
  1. Provide context, rationale and expected length of time for the activity, including the debriefing.
  2. Separate staff into groups of 4-6. Designate 1 person per group as the “observer”.
  3. Each group gets a puzzle (without lid) to complete.
  4. Brief the groups: “This game allows a group to work together. Are you clear on who is in your group? There are no rules. The only objective is to complete the puzzle. You have 3 minutes to put the puzzle together starting now.”

 

Facilitator’s Notes:
  1. Groups finishing the puzzle will often ask about the missing puzzle piece. Respond along the lines of,  “If the puzzle was a resident and you were missing information needed for the resident’s care, what would you do?” This usually incites searching activities.
  2. If someone asks for the lid, picture or missing piece, give it to them. The key is for someone to ask appropriately; not just demand it or assume that you will give the missing piece. Creative individuals will sometimes look through the facilitator’s belongings without asking and we’ve never dissuaded it, as it shows risk-taking and resourcefulness.
  3. Some groups will need more than 3 minutes to complete the puzzle. Time can be extended by increments of 3-5 minutes to add pressure to the task. Some groups may not finish the puzzle during the allotted time. Use your judgment about when to wrap up the puzzle-making.
  4. Be sure to leave adequate time for debriefing – it’s key to translating learning to practice!

 

Debriefing:
  1. Ask the observer/s to comment on teamwork and interaction styles – e.g., was there a clear leader? If yes, were they elected or did they just take command?
  2. Ask the group members to comment on their role on the team. How did they contribute to getting the job done?
  3. Did group members use different strategies to put the puzzle together (e.g., edges, corners, colours, shapes or even looking at other groups)? How did that influence the group’s ability to problem-solve?
  4. Discuss if group members asked about and searched for missing information or not (picture, missing piece).
  5. Did the activity reflect their usual problem solving style at work (or in general)? What was different? What was similar?
  6. What solutions did they come up with to solve the twist to the activity? (i.e., the missing piece)
  7. How does this activity translate into day-to-day work? What can we take away from this activity?
  8. Have group members been in a situation when they were the missing puzzle piece (that prevented achievement of a goal)?

 

During debriefing, the facilitator encourages staff reflection while highlighting and positively reinforcing emerging themes:

  • Team work: common goals, effective communication (listening, wording questions and requests appropriately), collaboration, mutual respect, speaking up about information the team may need
  • Leadership: leading, following, being inclusive
  • Solution-focus: creativity, risk-taking, determination to achieve a goal

Communication at End-of-Life Webinar

Understanding the Hospice Palliative Care Approach to Inform Communication at End-of-Life in Long-Term Care

On February 28, 2017, the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) hosted a webinar surrounding the communication at end-of-life. This webinar was presented by Ruth Richardson, Hospice Palliative Care Nurse Educator at Algonquin College.

Background

Supported by funding from the Government of Ontario, The Ontario CLRI collaborated with Algonquin College to create resources aimed at teaching personal support workers working in LTC about communication at end-of-life through train-the-trainer workshops and PSW education. A variety of resources have been created to support this, including this webinar. Learn more about the Communication at End-of-Life Education Fund for LTC.

Webinar Recording


Supported by:

Bruyere Logo Algonquin College Logo

A Serious Game Kit: Trigger Match

A Game to Foster Team Collaboration in the Care of Persons with Dementia

The Baycrest CLRI team along with 2015 summer interns created and trialed a card game called Trigger Match that stimulates team discussion and enhances specific team skills regarding the care of persons with responsive behaviours.

The resources in this toolkit were developed using a quality improvement approach and are meant to foster player and facilitator awareness and insight into working together to find care solutions for long-term care residents with responsive behaviours related to dementia.

Complete Toolkit: Trigger Match Toolkit

Appendix A: Behaviour Cards

Print a ready-to-cut Behaviour Card Deck.

Appendix B: Trigger Cards & Chance Cards

Ready-to-print Trigger and Chance Card Deck.

Appendix C: Behaviours & Trigger Card Blank Templates

Ready-to-print: List of all the behaviours and triggers in an excel sheet, and blank template for the Behaviour and Trigger Cards.

Appendix D: Trigger Match Pocket Card/Cheat Sheet

Ready-to-print Cheat Sheet is meant to be printed double-sided with 6 slides of page 1 and 6 slides on page 2 on a 8.5 ” x 11” sheet. This produces 6 cheat sheets per page.

Appendix E: Sample Presentation/Handout to Introduce the Game

Ready-to-print sample presentation/handout to introduce the game.