Resource Audience Type: Leaders & Managers

Deprescribing.org

A framework and tools for encouraging discussions about deprescribing

Older adults living in long-term care (LTC) homes often take many medications each day – sometimes this is not necessary and can even be harmful. Deprescribing is the planned and supervised process of reducing doses or stopping medications.

Decisions about medications for residents are best made when people work together with their health-care providers. Everyone in an LTC resident’s care team can help make medication-related care safe and effective.

The Bruyère Deprescribing Research Team worked with stakeholders across Ontario’s LTC sector to identify four behaviours and develop supporting tools that help deprescribing become a part of the culture of care. Click on the links in each behaviour to access tools such as process guides, infographics, cue cards and videos:

  1. People living in LTC homes and their families/caregivers will participate in shared decision-making to establish and monitor goals of care with respect to medication use while taking into consideration effectiveness, safety and non-drug alternatives.
  2. All healthcare providers and personnel will observe for signs and symptoms in the people they care for and report changes as a result of medication adjustments, or changes that might prompt a deprescribing review.
  3. Prescribers in every health care setting will document reasons for use, goals and timelines for each medication.
  4. All members of the health care team will participate in conversations about deprescribing.

The Bruyère Deprescribing Research Team is a partner of Ontario CLRI at Bruyère. For more information about how these behaviours were identified, read the Deprescribing in LTC report.

Additional resources and tools for optimizing medication use in older adults
  1. Five evidence-based guidelines that help health care providers make informed assessments of a resident’s medication and explore possibilities for non-drug treatments.
  2. “Talking about Medications” workshops that can be offered to residents, caregivers and staff to help people have discussions about medication decisions. “Talking About Medications” Materials – Deprescribing.org
  3. The Canadian Deprescribing Network raises public awareness about deprescribing and provides resources to address safe drug and non-drug approaches. Do I still need this medication? Is deprescribing for you? (deprescribingnetwork.ca)
Author/Source

Deprescribing.org houses deprescribing guidelines and other resources developed by Dr. Barbara Farrell and Dr. Lisa McCarthy’s research team at the Bruyere Research Institute (Ottawa). Barbara and Lisa are pharmacists who work with older people and are concerned about the risks associated with medications in this population.

To learn more about their work visit deprescribing.org.


Supported by:

Bruyere Logo Deprescribing Logo

Dementia Simulation Toolkit

The Ontario CLRI at Baycrest develops and evaluates innovative educational approaches designed to enhance not only knowledge and skills, but also values and attitudes in learners. With the assistance of interprofessional summer interns, an initial dementia simulation was created and trialed. A final version is presented here in the form of a toolkit. The scripts and resources in this toolkit have evolved over time using a quality improvement approach and are meant to foster participant awareness and insight into living life with frailty and dementia.

This toolkit contains:

  • Information facilitators need to know regarding dementia and dementia
  • Simulation techniques and sample scenarios based on common experiences of the
    elderly in the healthcare system
  • Additional modifications for the scenarios
  • Ideas on how to structure the simulation session for an interprofessional audience,
    including the debrief

As a result, this toolkit will allow users to:

  •  Identify and utilize dementia simulation techniques and scenarios
  • Use these simulations to engage participants in reflection and develop a deeper
    understanding of dementia and frailty

Move to Trash

Dementia Simulation Toolkit 2.0

Developing Culturally Grounded Dementia Educational Materials for Indigenous Community-Based Care

About this Webinar

This webinar outlines the development of six culturally relevant fact sheets on dementia and dementia care that can be used by Indigenous family caregivers, health care providers, as well as other organizations interested in the promotion of dementia awareness and care in Indigenous communities. The fact sheets bridge essential biomedical knowledge deemed important to convey and Indigenous understandings and explanatory models of the illness. The development of culturally appropriate health promotion materials for Indigenous communities is not simply a cut and paste process where mainstream materials are adapted through changes to imagery but not meaning. Rather, the production of culturally-based materials requires grounding in Indigenous knowledge of specific illnesses and community based models of care.

This integrated webinar event is brought to you by brainXchange in partnership with the Alzheimer Society of Canada and the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA).

This webinar has been identified as a resource that supports Indigenous culture in long-term care by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle.

Saint Elizabeth First Nations, Inuit and Métis Program

About the Program

The Saint Elizabeth First Nations, Inuit and Métis Program provides virtual education at no cost to health care providers working in First Nation communities. Their national knowledge exchange network includes online courses, webinars, community forums and 24/7 access to peers and experts. They also partner with communities and organizations to better understand gaps and barriers to care and support improvements through action-based research.

This program has been identified as a resource that supports Indigenous culture in long-term care by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle.

A Guide for Planning and Providing Francophone LTC Services

About the Guide

This guide provides practical advice and tools for how to plan, develop and deliver LTC services for Francophones in the GTA and across Ontario and Canada. The guide is intended for all those involved in planning, advocating for, and providing Francophone health services in Ontario, particularly the LHINs, FLHPEs, FLHNs, health service providers, particularly LTC home administrators and boards, all staff of LTC homes, and Francophone community leaders.

Although the guide is geared toward designing and delivering LTC services in French, the information and tools would be beneficial for other community and residential care models for Francophones as well as services for seniors from other language minority groups.

The development of this guides was a collaborative effort between the French Health Network of Central Southwestern Ontario, Entité 4, Reflet Salvéo, Bendale Acres, the City of Toronto and other regional partners.