Resource Audience Type: Leaders & Managers

Ontario eConsult Program

eConsult is a secure web-based tool that allows physicians and nurse practitioners timely access to specialist advice for all patients and often eliminates the need for an in-person specialist visit. The Ontario CLRI is collaborating with the Ontario eConsult Program team to support the integration of its services into long-term care homes across Ontario.

The Ontario eConsult Program is led by the Ontario eConsult Centre of Excellence (eConsult COE), housed at The Ottawa Hospital in partnership with the Bruyère Research Institute. Delivery partners are the Ontario Telemedicine Network (OTN), OntarioMD, and eHealth Ontario, with the support of the Ministries of Health and Long-Term Care.

LGBT Tool Kit: Creating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans-Inclusive and Affirming Care and Services

About the Tool Kit

In 2008, the City of Toronto, Long-Term Care Homes & Services (LTCHS) published the LGBT Tool Kit for Creating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Culturally Competent Care at Toronto Long-Term Care Homes and Services. At the time, this work was groundbreaking in supporting and caring for LGBT residents in long-term care.

In 2017, the Tool Kit was updated and refreshed focusing on engagement within the organization given the experience gained since the original Tool Kit was published in 2008. In addition to building upon the successes, challenges and understanding further opportunities to deliver LGBTQ2S+-inclusive care and services, the LGBT Tool Kit: Creating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans Inclusive and Affirming Care and Services (2017) also supports self-reflection and learning for individuals wishing to learn more. While it is meant primarily for management and staff within LTCHS, the Tool Kit is also available to other organizations as a resource.

The first two sections of the updated Tool Kit, “Introduction and Background” and “Our Journey Continues,” provide context and set the stage for the following sections: “Achieving Social and Cultural Competency” and “Achieving Organizational Competency” which are related to how welcoming, inclusive and affirming environments can be created and supported by individuals and organizations. The Appendices contain resources related to a number of different areas that can be used as references to help support ongoing learning and understanding.

Resources are contained throughout the Tool Kit and include:

  • Self-study which provide links to resources throughout the Tool Kit
  • Self-reflection guide users through a series of questions to support thinking and understanding
  • Best practices provide readers with an opportunity to learn about a promising practice, process or initiative within Long-Term Care Homes and Services as well as other organizations
  • The appendices provide additional information in a variety of areas such as LGBTQ2S+-affirming religious and spiritual groups, LGBTQ2S+ activity protocols, community and educational resources
  • End notes also provide links to resources referenced throughout the Tool Kit

To request an electronic copy, please email ltc-ho@toronto.ca

Champlain BASE™ eConsult Webinar

Champlain BASE™ eConsult Expansion into Long-Term Care in Ontario

On February 6, 2018, the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) hosted this webinar which focuses primarily on the implementation of the Champlain BASE™ eConsult service in Ontario’s long-term care (LTC) homes in order to improve integration of care, patient safety, and quality of life for complex aging residents.

Presented by Dr. Clare Liddy, the webinar discusses:

  • eConsult background and origins
  • The need for specialist access in long-term care
  • What we know about the benefits of eConsult
  • The current project
  • How to become involved in the program

Background

The Champlain BASE™ eConsult service is a secure, online platform connecting primary care providers (PCP) to specialists. The Ontario CLRI are supporting the integration of the service into LTC across Ontario. A number of resources surrounding eConsult have been developed for those working in LTC, this webinar being one of them. Learn more about the Champlain BASE™ eConsult service.

Webinar Recording


Supported by:

Bruyere Logo eConsult logo

Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias in Indigenous Populations in Canada: Prevalence and Risk Factors

About the Report

Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias are recognized as an emerging health issue in Indigenous communities. Indigenous elders are considered to be among Canada’s most vulnerable citizens because they often face complex health issues stemming from socio-economic marginalization and a legacy of colonialism in addition to barriers in accessing health care. They have higher rates of many of the risk factors for dementia. As a result, the rates of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRDs) are expected to increase more rapidly among Indigenous elders compared to non-Indigenous older adults. Despite this recognition, relatively little is known about ADRDs among Indigenous peoples in Canada.

This paper summarizes what is known about the prevalence of ADRDs, the challenges associated with diagnosing dementias, and the risk factors associated with the development of dementias in Indigenous populations. The paper highlights several knowledge gaps with respect to the prevalence of various forms of dementia among different groups of Indigenous peoples, as well as differences in the way dementias present in Indigenous communities. The paper concludes by highlighting the need for integrated multi-sectoral approaches to address socio-economic equities and health disparities as preventative measures for ADRDs.

Copyright: 2018 National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health (NCCAH).  This publication was funded by the NCCAH and made possible through a financial contribution from the Public Health Agency of Canada.

End-of-Life Planning and Care Needs of LGBTQI2S Older Adults

About this Resource

The Crossing the Rainbow Bridge resource was created by Egale Canada Human Rights Trust in partnership with the National Seniors Advisory Committee, Maureen Aslin of End of Life Planning Canada, and LGBTQI2S+ community members for LGBTQI2S+ community members. It provides information on how LGBTQI2S+ older adults in Ontario can plan for legal matters and end-of-life care, access guidance for asserting these wishes through legal documents in preparing for end of life, and available resources and supports.

Creating Authentic Spaces Toolkit

About this Toolkit

The Creating Authentic Spaces toolkit is part of The 519’s efforts to challenge transphobia and to foster environments that are inclusive of gender identity and gender expression. People who identify as trans often experience barriers to accessing necessary services due to discrimination or harassment based on their gender identity and gender expression.

This toolkit explores the experiences and challenges faced by trans people and supports organizations and individuals to develop approaches to fostering a trans inclusive environment. The toolkit also highlights the small and larger steps individuals can take personally and within their organizations to create more inclusive spaces and services for trans people. Creating Authentic Spaces info sheets, posters and workshops are also listed on this webpage.

Team Puzzle Activity

Teamwork, Leadership, Solution-Focus

 

This experiential learning activity is a low-fidelity simulation suitable for entry-level and advanced educators and simulationists. The purpose is to foster reflection and insight about teamwork, leadership and solution-focused problem-solving. The simulation typically lasts 3-5 minutes and at least 15 minutes should be allotted for pre-briefing and debriefing for up to 4 teams.

 

Preparation:
  1. For each group of 4-6 staff, one 24-piece puzzle is required. A clock is needed to time the activity.
  2. Remove and keep the puzzle box lids nearby so that the final picture isn’t known for each puzzle, remove one center piece (marked on the back to identify the puzzle it belongs to) and hide it nearby (e.g., on your person).
  3. For more than 1 group, ideally use multiples of the same puzzle, removing the same puzzle piece from each one.

 

Activity Instructions:
  1. Provide context, rationale and expected length of time for the activity, including the debriefing.
  2. Separate staff into groups of 4-6. Designate 1 person per group as the “observer”.
  3. Each group gets a puzzle (without lid) to complete.
  4. Brief the groups: “This game allows a group to work together. Are you clear on who is in your group? There are no rules. The only objective is to complete the puzzle. You have 3 minutes to put the puzzle together starting now.”

 

Facilitator’s Notes:
  1. Groups finishing the puzzle will often ask about the missing puzzle piece. Respond along the lines of,  “If the puzzle was a resident and you were missing information needed for the resident’s care, what would you do?” This usually incites searching activities.
  2. If someone asks for the lid, picture or missing piece, give it to them. The key is for someone to ask appropriately; not just demand it or assume that you will give the missing piece. Creative individuals will sometimes look through the facilitator’s belongings without asking and we’ve never dissuaded it, as it shows risk-taking and resourcefulness.
  3. Some groups will need more than 3 minutes to complete the puzzle. Time can be extended by increments of 3-5 minutes to add pressure to the task. Some groups may not finish the puzzle during the allotted time. Use your judgment about when to wrap up the puzzle-making.
  4. Be sure to leave adequate time for debriefing – it’s key to translating learning to practice!

 

Debriefing:
  1. Ask the observer/s to comment on teamwork and interaction styles – e.g., was there a clear leader? If yes, were they elected or did they just take command?
  2. Ask the group members to comment on their role on the team. How did they contribute to getting the job done?
  3. Did group members use different strategies to put the puzzle together (e.g., edges, corners, colours, shapes or even looking at other groups)? How did that influence the group’s ability to problem-solve?
  4. Discuss if group members asked about and searched for missing information or not (picture, missing piece).
  5. Did the activity reflect their usual problem solving style at work (or in general)? What was different? What was similar?
  6. What solutions did they come up with to solve the twist to the activity? (i.e., the missing piece)
  7. How does this activity translate into day-to-day work? What can we take away from this activity?
  8. Have group members been in a situation when they were the missing puzzle piece (that prevented achievement of a goal)?

 

During debriefing, the facilitator encourages staff reflection while highlighting and positively reinforcing emerging themes:

  • Team work: common goals, effective communication (listening, wording questions and requests appropriately), collaboration, mutual respect, speaking up about information the team may need
  • Leadership: leading, following, being inclusive
  • Solution-focus: creativity, risk-taking, determination to achieve a goal