Resource Audience Type: Leaders & Managers

End-of-Life Planning and Care Needs of LGBTQI2S Older Adults

About this Resource

The Crossing the Rainbow Bridge resource was created by Egale Canada Human Rights Trust in partnership with the National Seniors Advisory Committee, Maureen Aslin of End of Life Planning Canada, and LGBTQI2S+ community members for LGBTQI2S+ community members. It provides information on how LGBTQI2S+ older adults in Ontario can plan for legal matters and end-of-life care, access guidance for asserting these wishes through legal documents in preparing for end of life, and available resources and supports.

Creating Authentic Spaces Toolkit

About this Toolkit

The Creating Authentic Spaces toolkit is part of The 519’s efforts to challenge transphobia and to foster environments that are inclusive of gender identity and gender expression. People who identify as trans often experience barriers to accessing necessary services due to discrimination or harassment based on their gender identity and gender expression.

This toolkit explores the experiences and challenges faced by trans people and supports organizations and individuals to develop approaches to fostering a trans inclusive environment. The toolkit also highlights the small and larger steps individuals can take personally and within their organizations to create more inclusive spaces and services for trans people. Creating Authentic Spaces info sheets, posters and workshops are also listed on this webpage.

Team Puzzle Activity

Teamwork, Leadership, Solution-Focus

 

This experiential learning activity is a low-fidelity simulation suitable for entry-level and advanced educators and simulationists. The purpose is to foster reflection and insight about teamwork, leadership and solution-focused problem-solving. The simulation typically lasts 3-5 minutes and at least 15 minutes should be allotted for pre-briefing and debriefing for up to 4 teams.

 

Preparation:
  1. For each group of 4-6 staff, one 24-piece puzzle is required. A clock is needed to time the activity.
  2. Remove and keep the puzzle box lids nearby so that the final picture isn’t known for each puzzle, remove one center piece (marked on the back to identify the puzzle it belongs to) and hide it nearby (e.g., on your person).
  3. For more than 1 group, ideally use multiples of the same puzzle, removing the same puzzle piece from each one.

 

Activity Instructions:
  1. Provide context, rationale and expected length of time for the activity, including the debriefing.
  2. Separate staff into groups of 4-6. Designate 1 person per group as the “observer”.
  3. Each group gets a puzzle (without lid) to complete.
  4. Brief the groups: “This game allows a group to work together. Are you clear on who is in your group? There are no rules. The only objective is to complete the puzzle. You have 3 minutes to put the puzzle together starting now.”

 

Facilitator’s Notes:
  1. Groups finishing the puzzle will often ask about the missing puzzle piece. Respond along the lines of,  “If the puzzle was a resident and you were missing information needed for the resident’s care, what would you do?” This usually incites searching activities.
  2. If someone asks for the lid, picture or missing piece, give it to them. The key is for someone to ask appropriately; not just demand it or assume that you will give the missing piece. Creative individuals will sometimes look through the facilitator’s belongings without asking and we’ve never dissuaded it, as it shows risk-taking and resourcefulness.
  3. Some groups will need more than 3 minutes to complete the puzzle. Time can be extended by increments of 3-5 minutes to add pressure to the task. Some groups may not finish the puzzle during the allotted time. Use your judgment about when to wrap up the puzzle-making.
  4. Be sure to leave adequate time for debriefing – it’s key to translating learning to practice!

 

Debriefing:
  1. Ask the observer/s to comment on teamwork and interaction styles – e.g., was there a clear leader? If yes, were they elected or did they just take command?
  2. Ask the group members to comment on their role on the team. How did they contribute to getting the job done?
  3. Did group members use different strategies to put the puzzle together (e.g., edges, corners, colours, shapes or even looking at other groups)? How did that influence the group’s ability to problem-solve?
  4. Discuss if group members asked about and searched for missing information or not (picture, missing piece).
  5. Did the activity reflect their usual problem solving style at work (or in general)? What was different? What was similar?
  6. What solutions did they come up with to solve the twist to the activity? (i.e., the missing piece)
  7. How does this activity translate into day-to-day work? What can we take away from this activity?
  8. Have group members been in a situation when they were the missing puzzle piece (that prevented achievement of a goal)?

 

During debriefing, the facilitator encourages staff reflection while highlighting and positively reinforcing emerging themes:

  • Team work: common goals, effective communication (listening, wording questions and requests appropriately), collaboration, mutual respect, speaking up about information the team may need
  • Leadership: leading, following, being inclusive
  • Solution-focus: creativity, risk-taking, determination to achieve a goal

Mouth Matters

Oral Health Care at Saint-Louis Residence

Oral health of residents should be a priority. The Ontario CLRI partnered with La Cité Collégiale in an effort to increase access to oral care resources for long-term care (LTC) homes.

Many LTC residents find it difficult to access a traditional dental office due to transportation, physical, and financial limitations. In an effort to improve access to oral care in LTC homes, the Ontario CLRI piloted a partnership with a local college’s dental hygiene program to develop a placement program, resources, and tools. The partnership sparked the creation of both an animated video outlining why oral care is important and a publication describing the partnership model, as well as the translation of the Oral Health Assessment Tool.

Background

There is growing awareness around the importance of oral care for overall health. LTC residents are particularly vulnerable to several risk factors for poor oral health that can lead to oral bacterial disease, bad breath, mouth sores, and pneumonia. Establishing partnerships with the dental hygiene community can bring oral health expertise on-site.

Links

Mouth Matters Video – An animated video that presents to staff and caregivers why oral care is important.

Oral Health Assessment Tool Translation – The purpose of this initiative was to produce a French translation of the OHAT that is acceptable to users — nurses and dental hygienists — and is conceptually and metrically equivalent to the English version originally developed.

Oral Health Partnership Brochure – This brochure describes a partnership between Ottawa’s Saint-Louis Residence (SLR) LTC home and the dental hygiene program at La Cité Collégiale. For a copy of the full report, please contact info@clri-ltc.ca


Supported by:

Bruyere Logo La Cite Logo

Supporting Diversity of Culture in Long-Term Care Needs Assessment

Description

The Ontario CLRI gathered evidence and experiences from across the province in this needs assessment to help understand the supports and resources needed to address the diversity of residents living in long-term care homes. It was guided by an advisory committee and reflects consultations with multiple stakeholders, a literature review and shared learnings from LTC homes across Ontario.  The results of this needs assessment served as support for the Ontario CLRI to formalize an advisory committee and work plan to identify and develop resources to support LTC homes in addressing and welcoming diversity.

Supporting Indigenous Culture in Ontario’s Long-Term Care Homes: Needs Assessment

Ontario’s Indigenous people have unique cultural requirements that must be supported by health care, including long-term care. This report summarizes the findings from a needs assessment to explore strategies to better support Ontario’s Indigenous people in long-term care homes.

As providers of person-centred care, long-term care homes must recognize and support the culture of their residents. To help the sector learn about the approaches other homes have used, and to understand the types of challenges homes have faced, the Ontario CLRI spent several months gathering evidence and experiences from around the province.

The project team worked closely with multiple stakeholders and advisory groups, and conducted a literature review. Learnings will help guide future work including the development of tools and resources to support Indigenous culture in long-term care, and to scale-up existing, successful practices. The report summarizes the findings of this work.

SOS Seniors Care Game App

Designed to enhance nursing, personal support worker and allied health gerontological specialty knowledge in the early identification and care of older adults living with frailty at risk of acute deterioration.