Resource Audience Type: Leaders & Managers

Teaching LTC Homes: Current and Future Opportunities

Melissa Donskov, Mary-Lou Van Der Horst, Raquel Meyer

Melissa Donskov, Mary-Lou Vander Horst, Raquel Meyer

The three inaugural Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation (CLRI) in Long-Term Care (LTC) — Baycrest, Schlelgel, and Bruyère — presented a panel discussion on April 15, 2015 at the OANHSS Annual Conference.

The presenters were: Melissa Donskov (Director of Operations, Bruyère CLRI), Raquel Meyer (Manager, Baycrest CLRI), and Mary-Lou Vander Horst (Director, Schlegel CLRI).

The presentation, “Teaching Long-Term Care Homes: Current and Future Opportunities”, opened with an overview of the history and international experience of teaching long-term care homes.  This was followed by a discussion on the Ontario experience, as well as the goals and structure of the Ontario CLRI Program.

The presenters shared the innovative approaches and projects undertaken by each CLRI, and discussed some of the key elements such as partnerships, internal/external influences, as well as integrating education, research, and quality improvement initiatives into the operational framework of a LTC home. The three speakers also participated in a discussion about the future vision and opportunities for teaching LTC homes; and their potential to foster cultures of learning, inquiry, and innovation across the sector.

Teaching LTC Homes: Current and Future Opportunities
Click on the link above for a copy of the presentation slides.

How to Screen Older Adults for Depression

Education Toolkit: How to Screen Older Adults for Depression using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)

This toolkit is designed as a health professions educational resource for educators seeking to teach healthcare staff and students on using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) to screen older adults for depression in long-term care.  The content of this education places specific emphasis on how to recognize signs and symptoms of depression, how depression is different from dementia, when and how to screen for depression using the PHQ-2, strategies to promote safety and wellness in persons with depression. Experiential learning techniques include the use of video simulations (found in Education Toolkit Part 2-3) for participants to practice and receive feedback using the screening forms. Slides, handouts and evaluation materials are also included for adaptation and use by the educator.

 

 

How to Screen Older Adults for Delirium

Education Toolkit: How to Screen Older Adults for Delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM)

This toolkit is designed as a health professions education resource for educators seeking to teach healthcare staff and students on using the CAM to screen older adults for delirium in long-term care. The content of this education places specific emphasis on how to recognize signs and symptoms of delirium, when and how to screen for delirium using the CAM, and strategies to promote safety and wellness in people with delirium. Experiential learning techniques include the use of video simulations (found in Education Toolkit Part 2-3) for participants to practice and receive feedback using the screening forms. Slides, handouts, and evaluation materials are also included for adaptation and use by the educator.

 

 

How Data Improves Quality of Care

Using Data to Improve Quality of Care for Long-Term Care Residents in Ontario

On February 11, 2016, the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) hosted a webinar that provided an overview of the value of health administration data at the provincial and local (i.e. long-term care home) levels.

This webinar recording outlines how to better understand the “alphabet soup of acronyms” and how to embrace long-term care (LTC) data as we strive to improve care and to make evidence-informed decisions. The presenters guide participants through the world of provincial data, giving clear examples of how large health administration databases can help improve quality of care in LTC.

Presenters

Peter Tanuseputro, MHSc, MD, CCFP, FRCPC Peter is trained as a Public Health and Preventive Medicine physician, and as a Family Physician (University of Toronto). His research includes using linked health administrative databases to develop population perspectives on health care use, and cost associated with aging and end of life in Ontario. At the Ontario CLRI, Peter is using routinely collected data held at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences to follow all Ontarians prior, during, and after admission into LTC.

Kathy Greene, BScOT, MPA Kathy attained a Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy and a Master of Public Administration. She worked as an OT before becoming an Admission Coordinator and Coordinator for the NRS System, later transitioning to the position of Clinical Manager for Bruyère’s Geriatric Rehabilitation Service. Today, Ms. Greene is Bruyère’s Director of Decision Support, Admissions, Health Records and Staff Scheduling.

Webinar Recording


Supported by:

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Specialized Units in Long-Term Care Homes

Meeting the Future Need Through Specialization in Long-Term Care Homes

On January 28, 2016, the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) hosted a webinar that presents the most current context for specialized units in Ontario, why select long-term care (LTC) homes sought designation, and how these units fit into the continuum of care.

Specialized units are a unique service arrangement for Ontario’s LTC homes to expand the role they can play in the continuum of care. This webinar recording is based on an applied research project that conducted a multi-stakeholder consultation to learn about the experiences of LTC homes running designated specialized units or specialized programs. Consultation feedback on areas such as other client sub-populations that could benefit from new specialized units will help to provide a systems planning perspective.

Presenters

Amy Porteous, Vice President of Public Affairs and Planning, provides leadership and oversight for Bruyère’s planning process, partnership development, cultivation of external relations and communications. Mrs. Porteous has a Masters in Health Administration from the University of Ottawa.

Zsofia Orosz, Manager of the Ontario CLRI at Bruyère, has a Masters in Health Administration from the Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa.

Webinar Recording


Supported by:

Bruyere Logo

Frail Aging Simulation

This toolkit and videos support educators in creating experiential learning experiences to foster empathy and an improved understanding of the physical changes and social bias often experienced by older adults living with frailty.

Toolkit: Frail Aging Simulation

Simulation is the imitation or emulation of some real thing, state of affairs or process. It is a methodology to help achieve educational goals. The most powerful and efficacious simulations are conducted based on strong educational principles, run by expert facilitators and within the context of the objectives of a curriculum. Simulation used for healthcare encompasses a range of activities that share a broad, similar purpose: to improve the safety, effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare services.

Frail Aging Simulation: Take a Walk in Their Shoes

Experiential learning to enhance empathy and knowledge of frail aging.

DIY Frail Aging Simulation Suit Video
This videos supports long-term care educators in creating experiential learning experiences to foster empathy and an improved understanding of the physical changes and social bias often experienced by older adults living with frailty.

Summer Student Internships

The Ontario CLRI at Baycrest offers summer fellowships for students in the health professions to help encourage Ontario’s future geriatric leaders.