Resource Audience Type: Leaders & Managers

Residents’ Bill of Rights – Multilingual

All long-term care homes in Ontario are governed by the Long-Term Care Homes Act (LTCHA), 2007. The Ontario Residents’ Bill of Rights is embedded in the LTCHA and accompanying Regulations (O. Reg. 79/10).  The requirements in the LTCHA ensure that residents of these homes receive safe, consistent, and high-quality resident-centered care in settings where residents feel at home, are treated with respect, and have the supports and services they need for their health and well-being. The Ontario Association of Residents’ Councils review and promote the Residents’ Bill of Rights.

In 2019, with support from the Ontario CLRI at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging, the Residents’ Bill of Rights was translated into 16 different languages. These translations will better support homes serving residents of diverse cultural backgrounds, and help to educate residents, team members and other stakeholders about the Residents’ Bill of Rights.

Guidelines for Supporting Adults with a Developmental Disability in Long-Term Care Homes

About the Guidelines

The Ministry of Community and Social Services and Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care developed guidelines to support adults living with developmental disabilities who are applying to, moving into and residing in a long-term care (LTC) home. These guidelines provide important information about the developmental services sector, how to apply to LTC homes, and processes that impact LTC home residents.

The Guidelines for Supporting Adults with a Developmental Disability When Applying to, Moving Into and Residing In a Long-Term Care Home assist with improving services for adults living with a developmental disability who choose to reside in a LTC home. The guidelines outline the importance of planning, choice and consent, and for adults living with developmental disabilities to receive appropriate care and support services in LTC homes.

The collaborative creation of these guidelines and usage of them demonstrates an integrated and coordinated approach to care within and between the Developmental Services and LTC home sectors. A commitment to improving the social and health outcomes for aging adults living with a developmental disability is based on the principles of choice, community inclusion, and self-directed planning.

Long-Term Care Community Connections

Resident care can be influenced by individual circumstances, including language, gender identity and expression, ability, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation and socioeconomic status. This guide aims to assist long-term care (LTC) homes in creating connections with their communities that support and acknowledges resident and team member diversity.

The below resources connect direct care partners and team members to local and provincial health and social services to support quality of life and enhance community integration. We encourage LTC homes to reach out to these organizations to create meaningful and enriching partnerships that can benefit everyone who is part of life in LTC.


Healthline Ontario local health and community services

Putting health information at the fingertips of Ontarians, thehealthline.ca is a website for Ontario patients, doctors, and health care providers to get accurate and up-to-date information about health services in their communities.

thehealthline.ca platform is a provincially integrated database and asset that can be leveraged by health service providers and planners to help make healthcare better together.

Key Features
• 14 regional sites organized by LHIN and sub-LHIN regions
• Free to use and prioritizes government-funded or low-cost services
• 45,000+ services from 20,000+ healthcare organizations
• Data managed by LHINs across Ontario
• Standardized language and quality tools used to update each record yearly
• Online tools for organizations to promote services, jobs, news, and events
• Mapping tools that show catchment area by sub-LHIN, First Nations and more
• Tracking and reporting tools for system planners
• Dynamic platform that easily supports provincial scaling of regional initiatives

thehealthline.ca

 


211 Ontario community programs and social services

What is 211?

  • 211 is the source Canadians trust when seeking information and services to deal with life’s challenges.
  • 211’s award-winning telephone helpline (2-1-1) and website provide a gateway to community, social, non-clinical health and related government services.
  • 211 helps to navigate the complex network of human services quickly and easily, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, in over 150 languages.
  • 211 connects people to the right information and services, strengthens Canada’s health and human services, and helps Canadians to become more engaged with their communities.

211 Ontario 

Intergenerational Partnerships Think Tank

Background

Across the province, long-term care (LTC) and retirement homes are struggling to meet staffing needs. A shortage of skilled workers is making it increasingly difficult for LTC homes to meet legislative requirements and continue to deliver quality care and services to their residents.

Canada’s rapidly aging population complicates this issue, as LTC homes must attract and recruit additional team members to prepare for the expected increase in residents. There is a lack of awareness about the opportunities that exist in LTC, which can make it difficult to generate interest in these careers. Other influential factors include ageism and negative perceptions of LTC.

Creating opportunities for students to learn about the many career opportunities that exist within LTC and retirement homes will contribute to the continued growth of this workforce. Ontario secondary schools offer co-operative education (co-op) and volunteer opportunities, and schools are regularly seeking meaningful positions for their students.

By forming structured partnerships, secondary schools and LTC operators can work together to:

  • offer students a variety of experiential learning opportunities based on their skills and interests;
  • help students engage in career planning at an earlier stage;
  • promote LTC as a viable career destination; and
  • use students’ positive experiences to reduce negative perceptions and combat ageism.

On-Demand Baycrest Behavioural Support Rounds

Baycrest Behaviour Support Rounds

Baycrest Behavioural Support Rounds are open to all health professionals and students and provide a learning forum to review leading practices in assessing and managing personal expressions, as demonstrated by individuals who live with dementia.

Accessible through Zoom, these rounds are co-sponsored by the Baycrest Toronto Central – LHIN Behaviour Support for Seniors Program and the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care at Baycrest.

 

Honouring Grief and Increasing Resiliency

This webinar will appeal to team members working in long-term care homes. We will examine the impact  of working with individuals and families experiencing chronic illness, dying and death. and how to build compassionate and resilient teams.

Recognizing that grief is a naturally present in workplace, we will honour the simultaneous joy and suffering that may be present. Central to this discussion will be how to strengthen self-awareness and self-kindness and sustain meaning in your work.

This webinar was originally presented on December 7, 2018, hosted by the Ontario CLRI at Bruyère.


About the presenters:


Tara Cohen, MSW, RSW

• Program Manager – Champlain Hospice Palliative Care Program;
• Private Practice – Individual/Group Therapy

Tara Cohen is a Registered Social Worker who is deeply committed to supporting individuals in achieving their optimal quality of life, throughout their life journey. Working as Program Manager in health systems planning at the Champlain Hospice Palliative Care Program, Tara encourages collaboration, integration and wellness across a variety of settings and populations, using a trauma-informed care perspective and mindfulness. Her hope is to attend to the needs and suffering, of individuals and families, as they walk their unique and collective paths through life, including illness, dying and death.

 

Pamela Grassau, PhD, MSW, BSW
•Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Carleton University;
•Lecturer, Division of Palliative Care, University of Ottawa;
•Affiliated Investigator, Bruyère Research Institute

Pam Grassau, an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at Carleton University, has been working with patients, families and care providers in palliative care education and research for the past 8 years. Focusing on families in end of life, and specifically mothers living with advanced illness and their adult daughters, her research focuses on care giving/receiving, life review, loss and legacy. A passionate believer in hospice, palliative care and in holistic relational ‘caring’ for all of us touched by advanced illness, end of life and bereavement, Pam’s works to weave self-compassion, narrative meaning-making, creative expression and transformative mindfulness into all parts of her life.

Learning Empathy through Simulation for Long-Term Care Staff

This resource offers English and French activities for low-cost simulations that are easy to use in large or small groups. The exercises can help long-term care staff develop a better understanding and empathy for residents affected by speech, visual, mobility, and hearing impairments.

The following activities are described in detail, including materials required, instructions and reflection questions.

The following simulations are described in detail in this PDF:

  • Speech impairment simulation activity
  • Visual impairment simulation activity
  • Mobility impairment activity
  • Hearing impairment activity

Author

Tracy Luciani is an Arts and Wellness Specialist working at Bruyère Continuing Care, and former Knowledge Broker with the Ontario CLRI at Bruyère. She aims to create spaces that invite collaboration and transformative action.

The Four Sacred Medicines

Description

This pamphlet from Anishnawbe Health Toronto provides information on the four sacred medicines: tobacco, sage, cedar, and sweetgrass, including what each medicine may be used for, and how to take care of the medicines.

This pamphlet has been identified as a resource that supports Indigenous culture in long-term care by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle.