Resource Audience Type: Leaders & Managers

On-Demand Baycrest Behavioural Support Rounds

Baycrest Behavioural Support Rounds are open to all health professionals and students and provide a learning forum to review leading practices in assessing and managing challenging responsive behaviours, as demonstrated by individuals who live with dementia.

Accessible through Zoom, these rounds are co-sponsored by the Baycrest Toronto Central – LHIN Behaviour Support for Seniors Program and the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care at Baycrest.

 

Honouring Grief and Increasing Resiliency

This webinar will appeal to team members working in long-term care homes. We will examine the impact  of working with individuals and families experiencing chronic illness, dying and death. and how to build compassionate and resilient teams.

Recognizing that grief is a naturally present in workplace, we will honour the simultaneous joy and suffering that may be present. Central to this discussion will be how to strengthen self-awareness and self-kindness and sustain meaning in your work.

This webinar was originally presented on December 7, 2018, hosted by the Ontario CLRI at Bruyère.


About the presenters:


Tara Cohen, MSW, RSW

• Program Manager – Champlain Hospice Palliative Care Program;
• Private Practice – Individual/Group Therapy

Tara Cohen is a Registered Social Worker who is deeply committed to supporting individuals in achieving their optimal quality of life, throughout their life journey. Working as Program Manager in health systems planning at the Champlain Hospice Palliative Care Program, Tara encourages collaboration, integration and wellness across a variety of settings and populations, using a trauma-informed care perspective and mindfulness. Her hope is to attend to the needs and suffering, of individuals and families, as they walk their unique and collective paths through life, including illness, dying and death.

 

Pamela Grassau, PhD, MSW, BSW
•Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Carleton University;
•Lecturer, Division of Palliative Care, University of Ottawa;
•Affiliated Investigator, Bruyère Research Institute

Pam Grassau, an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at Carleton University, has been working with patients, families and care providers in palliative care education and research for the past 8 years. Focusing on families in end of life, and specifically mothers living with advanced illness and their adult daughters, her research focuses on care giving/receiving, life review, loss and legacy. A passionate believer in hospice, palliative care and in holistic relational ‘caring’ for all of us touched by advanced illness, end of life and bereavement, Pam’s works to weave self-compassion, narrative meaning-making, creative expression and transformative mindfulness into all parts of her life.

Learning Empathy through Simulation for Long-Term Care Staff

This resource offers English and French activities for low-cost simulations that are easy to use in large or small groups. The exercises can help long-term care staff develop a better understanding and empathy for residents affected by speech, visual, mobility, and hearing impairments.

The following activities are described in detail, including materials required, instructions and reflection questions.

The following simulations are described in detail in this PDF:

  • Speech impairment simulation activity
  • Visual impairment simulation activity
  • Mobility impairment activity
  • Hearing impairment activity

Author

Tracy Luciani is an Arts and Wellness Specialist working at Bruyère Continuing Care, and former Knowledge Broker with the Ontario CLRI at Bruyère. She aims to create spaces that invite collaboration and transformative action.

The Four Sacred Medicines

Description

This pamphlet from Anishnawbe Health Toronto provides information on the four sacred medicines: tobacco, sage, cedar, and sweetgrass, including what each medicine may be used for, and how to take care of the medicines.

This pamphlet has been identified as a resource that supports Indigenous culture in long-term care by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle.

Deprescribing.org

Online tools for optimizing seniors’ medication use

Deprescribing is the planned and supervised process of reducing or stopping a medication that may be causing harm or no longer be of benefit.

The Bruyère Deprescribing Guidelines Research Team, a partner of Ontario CLRI, have created bilingual tools and resources to help health-care professionals and residents make shared decisions on whether or not a medication is still the right fit:

  1. Five evidence-based guidelines that help health-care providers make informed assessments of a resident’s medication and explore possibilities for non-drug treatments.
  2. Pamphlets that empower residents to engage in their health care. These pamphlets provide key questions residents can ask their care team about their medications and explain deprescribing in plain language.

Evidence

Studies on the making of the guidelines and algorithms have been published in Canadian Family Physician. The studies detail the process of gathering evidence and consulting primary care professionals for developing, reviewing and endorsing the guidelines. 

Kevin Pottie, Wade Thompson, Simon Davies, Jean Grenier, Cheryl A. Sadowski, Vivian Welch, Anne Holbrook, Cynthia Boyd, Robert Swenson, Andy Ma and Barbara Farrell

Canadian Family Physician May 2018, 64 (5) 339-351;

Lise M. Bjerre, Barbara Farrell, Matthew Hogel, Lyla Graham, Geneviève Lemay, Lisa McCarthy, Lalitha Raman-Wilms, Carlos Rojas-Fernandez, Samir Sinha, Wade Thompson, Vivian Welch and Andrew Wiens

Canadian Family Physician January 2018, 64 (1) 17-27;

Barbara Farrell, Cody Black, Wade Thompson, Lisa McCarthy, Carlos Rojas-Fernandez, Heather Lochnan, Salima Shamji, Ross Upshur, Manon Bouchard and Vivian Welch

Canadian Family Physician November 2017, 63 (11) 832-843;

Barbara Farrell, Kevin Pottie, Wade Thompson, Taline Boghossian, Lisa Pizzola, Farah Joy Rashid, Carlos Rojas-Fernandez, Kate Walsh, Vivian Welch and Paul Moayyedi

Canadian Family Physician May 2017, 63 (5) 354-364;

Author/Source

Deprescribing.org was created by Dr. Barbara Farrell and Dr. Cara Tannenbaum a pharmacist and physician respectively who are concerned with the rising use of medications in the aging population.

The development of the algorithms was supported by the Ontario Pharmacy Research Collaboration (OPEN) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

Links

Deprescribing.org Website 

Visit to learn more about deprescribing tools and resources.

Webinar – Shared Decision Making

This webinar highlights common elements of the deprescribing process and demonstrate approaches to engaging patients through shared decision-making.

Webinar – The Role of Community Pharmacists in Deprescribing

This webinar highlights research that explores how pharmacists practicing in community settings can embrace their roles as key partners in deprescribing as one strategy for tackling the global problem of medication-related harm.

Webinar – Alternative Supports for Deprescribing from Antidepressants

This webinar discusses how major depression can be difficult to treat, and how clinicians can sometimes feel constrained in choices of how to treat it (i.e., medications vs talk therapy). Other modalities with strong supporting evidence are presented along with suggestions on how these can be integrated into a deprescribing decision tree.

Article – What’s In Your Medicine Cabinet?

This article originally appeared in AdvantAge Ontario and discusses deprescribing for LTC homes.


Supported by:

Bruyere Logo Deprescribing Logo

Dementia Simulation Toolkit

The Ontario CLRI at Baycrest develops and evaluates innovative educational approaches designed to enhance not only knowledge and skills, but also values and attitudes in learners. With the assistance of interprofessional summer interns, an initial dementia simulation was created and trialed. A final version is presented here in the form of a toolkit. The scripts and resources in this toolkit have evolved over time using a quality improvement approach and are meant to foster participant awareness and insight into living life with frailty and dementia.

This toolkit contains:

  • Information facilitators need to know regarding dementia and dementia
  • Simulation techniques and sample scenarios based on common experiences of the
    elderly in the healthcare system
  • Additional modifications for the scenarios
  • Ideas on how to structure the simulation session for an interprofessional audience,
    including the debrief

As a result, this toolkit will allow users to:

  •  Identify and utilize dementia simulation techniques and scenarios
  • Use these simulations to engage participants in reflection and develop a deeper
    understanding of dementia and frailty

Move to Trash

Dementia Simulation Toolkit 2.0

Developing Culturally Grounded Dementia Educational Materials for Indigenous Community-Based Care

About this Webinar

This webinar outlines the development of six culturally relevant fact sheets on dementia and dementia care that can be used by Indigenous family caregivers, health care providers, as well as other organizations interested in the promotion of dementia awareness and care in Indigenous communities. The fact sheets bridge essential biomedical knowledge deemed important to convey and Indigenous understandings and explanatory models of the illness. The development of culturally appropriate health promotion materials for Indigenous communities is not simply a cut and paste process where mainstream materials are adapted through changes to imagery but not meaning. Rather, the production of culturally-based materials requires grounding in Indigenous knowledge of specific illnesses and community based models of care.

This integrated webinar event is brought to you by brainXchange in partnership with the Alzheimer Society of Canada and the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA).

This webinar has been identified as a resource that supports Indigenous culture in long-term care by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle.