Resource Audience Type: HR/Operations

Residents’ Bill of Rights – Multilingual

All long-term care homes in Ontario are governed by the Long-Term Care Homes Act (LTCHA), 2007. The Ontario Residents’ Bill of Rights is embedded in the LTCHA and accompanying Regulations (O. Reg. 79/10).  The requirements in the LTCHA ensure that residents of these homes receive safe, consistent, and high-quality resident-centered care in settings where residents feel at home, are treated with respect, and have the supports and services they need for their health and well-being. The Ontario Association of Residents’ Councils review and promote the Residents’ Bill of Rights.

In 2019, with support from the Ontario CLRI at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging, the Residents’ Bill of Rights was translated into 16 different languages. These translations will better support homes serving residents of diverse cultural backgrounds, and help to educate residents, team members and other stakeholders about the Residents’ Bill of Rights.

Guidelines for Supporting Adults with a Developmental Disability in Long-Term Care Homes

About the Guidelines

The Ministry of Community and Social Services and Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care developed guidelines to support adults living with developmental disabilities who are applying to, moving into and residing in a long-term care (LTC) home. These guidelines provide important information about the developmental services sector, how to apply to LTC homes, and processes that impact LTC home residents.

The Guidelines for Supporting Adults with a Developmental Disability When Applying to, Moving Into and Residing In a Long-Term Care Home assist with improving services for adults living with a developmental disability who choose to reside in a LTC home. The guidelines outline the importance of planning, choice and consent, and for adults living with developmental disabilities to receive appropriate care and support services in LTC homes.

The collaborative creation of these guidelines and usage of them demonstrates an integrated and coordinated approach to care within and between the Developmental Services and LTC home sectors. A commitment to improving the social and health outcomes for aging adults living with a developmental disability is based on the principles of choice, community inclusion, and self-directed planning.

Long-Term Care Community Connections

Resident care can be influenced by individual circumstances, including language, gender identity and expression, ability, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation and socioeconomic status. This guide aims to assist long-term care (LTC) homes in creating connections with their communities that support and acknowledges resident and team member diversity.

The below resources connect direct care partners and team members to local and provincial health and social services to support quality of life and enhance community integration. We encourage LTC homes to reach out to these organizations to create meaningful and enriching partnerships that can benefit everyone who is part of life in LTC.


Healthline Ontario local health and community services

Putting health information at the fingertips of Ontarians, thehealthline.ca is a website for Ontario patients, doctors, and health care providers to get accurate and up-to-date information about health services in their communities.

thehealthline.ca platform is a provincially integrated database and asset that can be leveraged by health service providers and planners to help make healthcare better together.

Key Features
• 14 regional sites organized by LHIN and sub-LHIN regions
• Free to use and prioritizes government-funded or low-cost services
• 45,000+ services from 20,000+ healthcare organizations
• Data managed by LHINs across Ontario
• Standardized language and quality tools used to update each record yearly
• Online tools for organizations to promote services, jobs, news, and events
• Mapping tools that show catchment area by sub-LHIN, First Nations and more
• Tracking and reporting tools for system planners
• Dynamic platform that easily supports provincial scaling of regional initiatives

thehealthline.ca

 


211 Ontario community programs and social services

What is 211?

  • 211 is the source Canadians trust when seeking information and services to deal with life’s challenges.
  • 211’s award-winning telephone helpline (2-1-1) and website provide a gateway to community, social, non-clinical health and related government services.
  • 211 helps to navigate the complex network of human services quickly and easily, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, in over 150 languages.
  • 211 connects people to the right information and services, strengthens Canada’s health and human services, and helps Canadians to become more engaged with their communities.

211 Ontario 

On-Demand Baycrest Behavioural Support Rounds

Baycrest Behaviour Support Rounds

Baycrest Behavioural Support Rounds are open to all health professionals and students and provide a learning forum to review leading practices in assessing and managing personal expressions, as demonstrated by individuals who live with dementia.

Accessible through Zoom, these rounds are co-sponsored by the Baycrest Toronto Central – LHIN Behaviour Support for Seniors Program and the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care at Baycrest.

 

Deprescribing.org

A framework and tools for encouraging discussions about deprescribing

Older adults living in long-term care (LTC) homes often take many medications each day – sometimes this is not necessary and can even be harmful. Deprescribing is the planned and supervised process of reducing doses or stopping medications.

Decisions about medications for residents are best made when people work together with their health-care providers. Everyone in an LTC resident’s care team can help make medication-related care safe and effective.

The Bruyère Deprescribing Research Team worked with stakeholders across Ontario’s LTC sector to identify four behaviours and develop supporting tools that help deprescribing become a part of the culture of care. Click on the links in each behaviour to access tools such as process guides, infographics, cue cards and videos:

  1. People living in LTC homes and their families/caregivers will participate in shared decision-making to establish and monitor goals of care with respect to medication use while taking into consideration effectiveness, safety and non-drug alternatives.
  2. All healthcare providers and personnel will observe for signs and symptoms in the people they care for and report changes as a result of medication adjustments, or changes that might prompt a deprescribing review.
  3. Prescribers in every health care setting will document reasons for use, goals and timelines for each medication.
  4. All members of the health care team will participate in conversations about deprescribing.

The Bruyère Deprescribing Research Team is a partner of Ontario CLRI at Bruyère. For more information about how these behaviours were identified, read the Deprescribing in LTC report.

Additional resources and tools for optimizing medication use in older adults
  1. Five evidence-based guidelines that help health care providers make informed assessments of a resident’s medication and explore possibilities for non-drug treatments.
  2. “Talking about Medications” workshops that can be offered to residents, caregivers and staff to help people have discussions about medication decisions. “Talking About Medications” Materials – Deprescribing.org
  3. The Canadian Deprescribing Network raises public awareness about deprescribing and provides resources to address safe drug and non-drug approaches. Do I still need this medication? Is deprescribing for you? (deprescribingnetwork.ca)
Author/Source

Deprescribing.org houses deprescribing guidelines and other resources developed by Dr. Barbara Farrell and Dr. Lisa McCarthy’s research team at the Bruyere Research Institute (Ottawa). Barbara and Lisa are pharmacists who work with older people and are concerned about the risks associated with medications in this population.

To learn more about their work visit deprescribing.org.


Supported by:

Bruyere Logo Deprescribing Logo

Supporting Diversity and Indigenous Culture in Long-Term Care

About the Presentation

The needs of residents in long-term care can be affected by their gender, language, Indigenous identity, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, etc. In response to this diversity, the Ontario Centres for Learning Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) are engaging provincial stakeholders to identify and develop education and other resources that support the diversity of residents in long-term care. This presentation shares inspirational stories and resources that can support long-term care homes in their delivery of resident-centered care in a way that acknowledges individual diversity and aligns with Ontario’s Action Plan for Seniors.

This presentation was delivered at the Together We Care Conference on April 20, 2018.