Resource Audience Type: Residents

Empowering Residents and Secondary School Students Through Experiential Learning in LTC Homes

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Partnerships between long-term care (LTC) homes and secondary schools create opportunities to reduce negative perceptions and improve well-being through positive experiences. Experiential Learning in Long-Term Care: A Guidebook for Building Partnerships Between Secondary Schools and Long-Term Care Homes guides LTC homes and secondary schools through the process of building partnerships and implementing placement opportunities for students. These opportunities help build capacity within homes, and support a recruitment strategy for the future LTC workforce by generating interest in LTC careers.

This webinar was presented in partnership with the Ontario Association of Residents’ Councils (OARC).Ontario Association of Residents' Councils logo- black and blue

By watching this webinar, you will:

  • Understand the benefits of experiential learning placements in LTC for secondary school students, residents and team members.
  • Learn how to use the guidebook and online resources to build effective partnerships.
  • Leave with practical strategies and resources to start or enhance your experiential learning partnership.

Palliative Care Toolkit for Indigenous Communities

About the Toolkit

The Palliative Care Toolkit for Indigenous Communities was created by Cancer Care Ontario in collaboration with First Nations, Métis and Inuit families and communities.  It includes:

  • First Nations, Inuit and Métis definitions of palliative care
  • Personal stories and other resources to help First Nations, Inuit and Métis families and communities develop capacity in palliative care, and cope with grief and loss
  • Information to support decision-making and planning for Indigenous people living with advanced cancer
  • Information to help care partners care for community members living with advanced cancer

This program has been identified as a resource that supports Indigenous culture in long-term care by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle.

Meaning, Memory & Mystery: Exploring Spiritual Care in Long-term Care

When life is difficult, it begs for meaning: Who am I? Why am I still alive? What is my role, now, in my family and community? How do I deal with change and loss? What is the meaning of life? These are spiritual questions.

Canadian society is shifting from a time when traditional religious expression was common, to greater diversity in our understandings of spirituality. How, then, do we support the spirits of all those in our long-term care (LTC) communities? What addresses our needs for love, hope, peace, joy?

 

By watching this webinar you will…

    • Explore the meaning of ‘spirituality’ and how it intersects with the experience of aging.
    • Become more aware of:
      – The spiritual needs of residents.
      – ‘Spiritual resources’ people access and how we can support them.
      – Barriers that get in the way of optimum spiritual care.
    • Imagine new ways of supporting the spirits of residents, families and team members, making spiritual care more accessible for everyone.

About the Presenter

 Jane Kuepfer PHD, MDIV, RP, Schlegel Specialist in Spirituality and Aging

Jane has extensive experience as a spiritual caregiver in long-term care homes and in the community, as a registered psychotherapist, a spiritual director, and an ordained Minister in the Mennonite Church and the United Church of Canada. Jane completed a doctorate in Human Relationships (Spiritual Care and Psychotherapy) at Martin Luther University College with a dissertation focus in the area of Spirituality and Aging. As part of her role at the Schlegel-UW RIA, Jane coordinates an annual Spirituality and Aging Seminar, conducts research, and teaches graduate courses in Spirituality and Aging.

Residents’ Bill of Rights – Multilingual

All long-term care homes in Ontario are governed by the Long-Term Care Homes Act (LTCHA), 2007. The Ontario Residents’ Bill of Rights is embedded in the LTCHA and accompanying Regulations (O. Reg. 79/10).  The requirements in the LTCHA ensure that residents of these homes receive safe, consistent, and high-quality resident-centered care in settings where residents feel at home, are treated with respect, and have the supports and services they need for their health and well-being. The Ontario Association of Residents’ Councils review and promote the Residents’ Bill of Rights.

In 2019, with support from the Ontario CLRI at the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging, the Residents’ Bill of Rights was translated into 16 different languages. These translations will better support homes serving residents of diverse cultural backgrounds, and help to educate residents, team members and other stakeholders about the Residents’ Bill of Rights.

Long-Term Care Community Connections

Resident care can be influenced by individual circumstances, including language, gender identity and expression, ability, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation and socioeconomic status. This guide aims to assist long-term care (LTC) homes in creating connections with their communities that support and acknowledges resident and team member diversity.

The below resources connect direct care partners and team members to local and provincial health and social services to support quality of life and enhance community integration. We encourage LTC homes to reach out to these organizations to create meaningful and enriching partnerships that can benefit everyone who is part of life in LTC.


Healthline Ontario local health and community services

Putting health information at the fingertips of Ontarians, thehealthline.ca is a website for Ontario patients, doctors, and health care providers to get accurate and up-to-date information about health services in their communities.

thehealthline.ca platform is a provincially integrated database and asset that can be leveraged by health service providers and planners to help make healthcare better together.

Key Features
• 14 regional sites organized by LHIN and sub-LHIN regions
• Free to use and prioritizes government-funded or low-cost services
• 45,000+ services from 20,000+ healthcare organizations
• Data managed by LHINs across Ontario
• Standardized language and quality tools used to update each record yearly
• Online tools for organizations to promote services, jobs, news, and events
• Mapping tools that show catchment area by sub-LHIN, First Nations and more
• Tracking and reporting tools for system planners
• Dynamic platform that easily supports provincial scaling of regional initiatives

thehealthline.ca

 


211 Ontario community programs and social services

What is 211?

  • 211 is the source Canadians trust when seeking information and services to deal with life’s challenges.
  • 211’s award-winning telephone helpline (2-1-1) and website provide a gateway to community, social, non-clinical health and related government services.
  • 211 helps to navigate the complex network of human services quickly and easily, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, in over 150 languages.
  • 211 connects people to the right information and services, strengthens Canada’s health and human services, and helps Canadians to become more engaged with their communities.

211 Ontario