Resource Topic: Indigenous

Indigenous Culture Card – London and Middlesex

The following resource was not created by the Ontario CLRI and was identified by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle as an important resource to support Indigenous Culture in LTC. 

 


This guide was developed by Healthy Weights Connection (Western University) and London’s Child and Youth Network in response to overwhelming interest expressed by service providers in London and Middlesex County to learn more about First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) cultures and local communities. It has been adapted from a similar cultural awareness resource developed by the Barrie Area Native Advisory Circle (BANAC).

The content of this guide was informed by members of the local FNMI community in London and Middlesex through several engagement sessions. The purpose of the guide is to serve as a first step towards cultural competence and to help service providers learn more about FNMI history, the local cultures and how to work competently and sensitively with FNMI communities. For those interested in formal training, Indigenous Cultural Competency and Cultural Safety training are recommended.

Download the Indigenous Culture Card 

Palliative Care Toolkit for Indigenous Communities

About the Toolkit

The Palliative Care Toolkit for Indigenous Communities was created by Cancer Care Ontario in collaboration with First Nations, Métis and Inuit families and communities.  It includes:

  • First Nations, Inuit and Métis definitions of palliative care
  • Personal stories and other resources to help First Nations, Inuit and Métis families and communities develop capacity in palliative care, and cope with grief and loss
  • Information to support decision-making and planning for Indigenous people living with advanced cancer
  • Information to help care partners care for community members living with advanced cancer

This program has been identified as a resource that supports Indigenous culture in long-term care by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle.

The Four Sacred Medicines

Description

This pamphlet from Anishnawbe Health Toronto provides information on the four sacred medicines: tobacco, sage, cedar, and sweetgrass, including what each medicine may be used for, and how to take care of the medicines.

This pamphlet has been identified as a resource that supports Indigenous culture in long-term care by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle.

Developing Culturally Grounded Dementia Educational Materials for Indigenous Community-Based Care

About this Webinar

This webinar outlines the development of six culturally relevant fact sheets on dementia and dementia care that can be used by Indigenous family caregivers, health care providers, as well as other organizations interested in the promotion of dementia awareness and care in Indigenous communities. The fact sheets bridge essential biomedical knowledge deemed important to convey and Indigenous understandings and explanatory models of the illness. The development of culturally appropriate health promotion materials for Indigenous communities is not simply a cut and paste process where mainstream materials are adapted through changes to imagery but not meaning. Rather, the production of culturally-based materials requires grounding in Indigenous knowledge of specific illnesses and community based models of care.

This integrated webinar event is brought to you by brainXchange in partnership with the Alzheimer Society of Canada and the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA).

This webinar has been identified as a resource that supports Indigenous culture in long-term care by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle.

Saint Elizabeth First Nations, Inuit and Métis Program

About the Program

The Saint Elizabeth First Nations, Inuit and Métis Program provides virtual education at no cost to health care providers working in First Nation communities. Their national knowledge exchange network includes online courses, webinars, community forums and 24/7 access to peers and experts. They also partner with communities and organizations to better understand gaps and barriers to care and support improvements through action-based research.

This program has been identified as a resource that supports Indigenous culture in long-term care by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle.