Resource Topic: Indigenous

Supporting Diversity and Indigenous Culture in Long-Term Care

About the Presentation

The needs of residents in long-term care can be affected by their gender, language, Indigenous identity, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, etc. In response to this diversity, the Ontario Centres for Learning Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care (CLRI) are engaging provincial stakeholders to identify and develop education and other resources that support the diversity of residents in long-term care. This presentation shares inspirational stories and resources that can support long-term care homes in their delivery of resident-centered care in a way that acknowledges individual diversity and aligns with Ontario’s Action Plan for Seniors.

This presentation was delivered at the Together We Care Conference on April 20, 2018.

 

Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias in Indigenous Populations in Canada: Prevalence and Risk Factors

About the Report

Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias are recognized as an emerging health issue in Indigenous communities. Indigenous elders are considered to be among Canada’s most vulnerable citizens because they often face complex health issues stemming from socio-economic marginalization and a legacy of colonialism in addition to barriers in accessing health care. They have higher rates of many of the risk factors for dementia. As a result, the rates of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRDs) are expected to increase more rapidly among Indigenous elders compared to non-Indigenous older adults. Despite this recognition, relatively little is known about ADRDs among Indigenous peoples in Canada.

This paper summarizes what is known about the prevalence of ADRDs, the challenges associated with diagnosing dementias, and the risk factors associated with the development of dementias in Indigenous populations. The paper highlights several knowledge gaps with respect to the prevalence of various forms of dementia among different groups of Indigenous peoples, as well as differences in the way dementias present in Indigenous communities. The paper concludes by highlighting the need for integrated multi-sectoral approaches to address socio-economic equities and health disparities as preventative measures for ADRDs.

Copyright: 2018 National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health (NCCAH).  This publication was funded by the NCCAH and made possible through a financial contribution from the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Supporting Indigenous Culture in Ontario’s Long-Term Care Homes: Needs Assessment

Ontario’s Indigenous people have unique cultural requirements that must be supported by health care, including long-term care. This report summarizes the findings from a needs assessment to explore strategies to better support Ontario’s Indigenous people in long-term care homes.

As providers of person-centred care, long-term care homes must recognize and support the culture of their residents. To help the sector learn about the approaches other homes have used, and to understand the types of challenges homes have faced, the Ontario CLRI spent several months gathering evidence and experiences from around the province.

The project team worked closely with multiple stakeholders and advisory groups, and conducted a literature review. Learnings will help guide future work including the development of tools and resources to support Indigenous culture in long-term care, and to scale-up existing, successful practices. The report summarizes the findings of this work.