Resource Topic: Mental health

Guidelines for Supporting Adults with a Developmental Disability in Long-Term Care Homes

About the Guidelines

The Ministry of Community and Social Services and Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care developed guidelines to support adults living with developmental disabilities who are applying to, moving into and residing in a long-term care (LTC) home. These guidelines provide important information about the developmental services sector, how to apply to LTC homes, and processes that impact LTC home residents.

The Guidelines for Supporting Adults with a Developmental Disability When Applying to, Moving Into and Residing In a Long-Term Care Home assist with improving services for adults living with a developmental disability who choose to reside in a LTC home. The guidelines outline the importance of planning, choice and consent, and for adults living with developmental disabilities to receive appropriate care and support services in LTC homes.

The collaborative creation of these guidelines and usage of them demonstrates an integrated and coordinated approach to care within and between the Developmental Services and LTC home sectors. A commitment to improving the social and health outcomes for aging adults living with a developmental disability is based on the principles of choice, community inclusion, and self-directed planning.

Honouring Grief and Increasing Resiliency

This webinar will appeal to team members working in long-term care homes. We will examine the impact  of working with individuals and families experiencing chronic illness, dying and death. and how to build compassionate and resilient teams.

Recognizing that grief is a naturally present in workplace, we will honour the simultaneous joy and suffering that may be present. Central to this discussion will be how to strengthen self-awareness and self-kindness and sustain meaning in your work.

This webinar was originally presented on December 7, 2018, hosted by the Ontario CLRI at Bruyère.


About the presenters:


Tara Cohen, MSW, RSW

• Program Manager – Champlain Hospice Palliative Care Program;
• Private Practice – Individual/Group Therapy

Tara Cohen is a Registered Social Worker who is deeply committed to supporting individuals in achieving their optimal quality of life, throughout their life journey. Working as Program Manager in health systems planning at the Champlain Hospice Palliative Care Program, Tara encourages collaboration, integration and wellness across a variety of settings and populations, using a trauma-informed care perspective and mindfulness. Her hope is to attend to the needs and suffering, of individuals and families, as they walk their unique and collective paths through life, including illness, dying and death.

 

Pamela Grassau, PhD, MSW, BSW
•Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Carleton University;
•Lecturer, Division of Palliative Care, University of Ottawa;
•Affiliated Investigator, Bruyère Research Institute

Pam Grassau, an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at Carleton University, has been working with patients, families and care providers in palliative care education and research for the past 8 years. Focusing on families in end of life, and specifically mothers living with advanced illness and their adult daughters, her research focuses on care giving/receiving, life review, loss and legacy. A passionate believer in hospice, palliative care and in holistic relational ‘caring’ for all of us touched by advanced illness, end of life and bereavement, Pam’s works to weave self-compassion, narrative meaning-making, creative expression and transformative mindfulness into all parts of her life.

How to Screen Older Adults for Depression

Education Toolkit: How to Screen Older Adults for Depression using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)

This toolkit is designed as a health professions educational resource for educators seeking to teach healthcare staff and students on using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) to screen older adults for depression in long-term care.  The content of this education places specific emphasis on how to recognize signs and symptoms of depression, how depression is different from dementia, when and how to screen for depression using the PHQ-2, strategies to promote safety and wellness in persons with depression. Experiential learning techniques include the use of video simulations (found in Education Toolkit Part 2-3) for participants to practice and receive feedback using the screening forms. Slides, handouts and evaluation materials are also included for adaptation and use by the educator.

 

 

How to Screen Older Adults for Delirium

Education Toolkit: How to Screen Older Adults for Delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM)

This toolkit is designed as a health professions education resource for educators seeking to teach healthcare staff and students on using the CAM to screen older adults for delirium in long-term care. The content of this education places specific emphasis on how to recognize signs and symptoms of delirium, when and how to screen for delirium using the CAM, and strategies to promote safety and wellness in people with delirium. Experiential learning techniques include the use of video simulations (found in Education Toolkit Part 2-3) for participants to practice and receive feedback using the screening forms. Slides, handouts, and evaluation materials are also included for adaptation and use by the educator.