Resource Type: Report

Workplace Mental Health in LTC

Jump to…
About the Initiative | Learn About the National Standard | Plan to Implement the Standard
Conduct an Assessment | Additional Resources | Advisory Group Members


Call for Expressions of Interest

Workplace Mental Health in LTC for Early Adopters: Leadership Training and Support Program

The deadline to submit expressions of interest is now closed.

The Ontario CLRI at the RIA invites leaders in long-term care to take your workplace mental health strategy to the next level. Learn how to build an organizational culture that promotes and protects the mental health of all team members, and improves workforce productivity, recruitment and retention.

Go to the Call for Expressions of Interest


About the Initiative

This Workplace Mental Health in LTC initiative supports long-term care (LTC) homes across Ontario to adopt the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace. The Standard was published in 2013 and defines a systematic approach to creating and sustaining a psychologically safe and healthy work environment.

Working in LTC is psychologically demanding. Frontline workers experience physical and emotional stress, time pressures, bullying, violence, racism, and a workplace culture that often devalues the role of care providers. According to the Ontario government’s Long-Term Care Staffing Study (July 2020), team members in LTC are “feeling burnt out, overwhelmed, and unrecognized.” These conditions contribute to high rates of injury, disability, absenteeism, staff turnover and recruitment challenges. The COVID-19 pandemic has only magnified these issues and highlighted the need for change in Ontario’s long-term care system. Emerging research shows that workers are experiencing rising levels of depression, anxiety, grief and post-traumatic stress.

The Ontario CLRI is collaborating with mental health experts, occupational health and safety service providers, unions, researchers, educators, provincial associations and other stakeholders to co-design an effective and sustainable support system for LTC homes. The Psychological Health and Safety in Long-Term Care initiative will promote evidence-based resources, offer training programs tailored for the LTC sector, and cultivate a network of psychological health and safety champions. By creating a workplace culture that promotes and protects mental health, leaders in LTC can build and retain a resilient workforce that is well equipped to provide quality care for residents and support for families.

A Psychological Health and Safety in Long-Term Care Advisory Committee (see below) and other experts contribute to the work of this initiative.

Indigenous Culture Card – London and Middlesex

The following resource was not created by the Ontario CLRI and was identified by the Ontario Caring Advisory Circle as an important resource to support Indigenous Culture in LTC. 

 


This guide was developed by Healthy Weights Connection (Western University) and London’s Child and Youth Network in response to overwhelming interest expressed by service providers in London and Middlesex County to learn more about First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) cultures and local communities. It has been adapted from a similar cultural awareness resource developed by the Barrie Area Native Advisory Circle (BANAC).

The content of this guide was informed by members of the local FNMI community in London and Middlesex through several engagement sessions. The purpose of the guide is to serve as a first step towards cultural competence and to help service providers learn more about FNMI history, the local cultures and how to work competently and sensitively with FNMI communities. For those interested in formal training, Indigenous Cultural Competency and Cultural Safety training are recommended.

Download the Indigenous Culture Card 

Ontario eConsult Program

eConsult is a secure web-based tool that allows physicians and nurse practitioners timely access to specialist advice for all patients and often eliminates the need for an in-person specialist visit. The Ontario CLRI is collaborating with the Ontario eConsult Program team to support the integration of its services into long-term care homes across Ontario.

The Ontario eConsult Program is led by the Ontario eConsult Centre of Excellence (eConsult COE), housed at The Ottawa Hospital in partnership with the Bruyère Research Institute. Delivery partners are the Ontario Telemedicine Network (OTN), OntarioMD, and eHealth Ontario, with the support of the Ministries of Health and Long-Term Care.

Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias in Indigenous Populations in Canada: Prevalence and Risk Factors

About the Report

Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias are recognized as an emerging health issue in Indigenous communities. Indigenous elders are considered to be among Canada’s most vulnerable citizens because they often face complex health issues stemming from socio-economic marginalization and a legacy of colonialism in addition to barriers in accessing health care. They have higher rates of many of the risk factors for dementia. As a result, the rates of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRDs) are expected to increase more rapidly among Indigenous elders compared to non-Indigenous older adults. Despite this recognition, relatively little is known about ADRDs among Indigenous peoples in Canada.

This paper summarizes what is known about the prevalence of ADRDs, the challenges associated with diagnosing dementias, and the risk factors associated with the development of dementias in Indigenous populations. The paper highlights several knowledge gaps with respect to the prevalence of various forms of dementia among different groups of Indigenous peoples, as well as differences in the way dementias present in Indigenous communities. The paper concludes by highlighting the need for integrated multi-sectoral approaches to address socio-economic equities and health disparities as preventative measures for ADRDs.

Copyright: 2018 National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health (NCCAH).  This publication was funded by the NCCAH and made possible through a financial contribution from the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Mouth Matters

Oral Health Care at Saint-Louis Residence

Oral health of residents should be a priority. The Ontario CLRI partnered with La Cité Collégiale in an effort to increase access to oral care resources for long-term care (LTC) homes.

Many LTC residents find it difficult to access a traditional dental office due to transportation, physical, and financial limitations. In an effort to improve access to oral care in LTC homes, the Ontario CLRI piloted a partnership with a local college’s dental hygiene program to develop a placement program, resources, and tools. The partnership sparked the creation of both an animated video outlining why oral care is important and a publication describing the partnership model, as well as the translation of the Oral Health Assessment Tool.

Background

There is growing awareness around the importance of oral care for overall health. LTC residents are particularly vulnerable to several risk factors for poor oral health that can lead to oral bacterial disease, bad breath, mouth sores, and pneumonia. Establishing partnerships with the dental hygiene community can bring oral health expertise on-site.

Links

Mouth Matters Video – An animated video that presents to staff and caregivers why oral care is important.

Oral Health Assessment Tool Translation – The purpose of this initiative was to produce a French translation of the OHAT that is acceptable to users — nurses and dental hygienists — and is conceptually and metrically equivalent to the English version originally developed.

Oral Health Partnership Brochure – This brochure describes a partnership between Ottawa’s Saint-Louis Residence (SLR) LTC home and the dental hygiene program at La Cité Collégiale. For a copy of the full report, please contact info@clri-ltc.ca


Supported by:

Bruyere Logo La Cite Logo

Supporting Diversity of Culture in Long-Term Care Needs Assessment

Description

The Ontario CLRI gathered evidence and experiences from across the province in this needs assessment to help understand the supports and resources needed to address the diversity of residents living in long-term care homes. It was guided by an advisory committee and reflects consultations with multiple stakeholders, a literature review and shared learnings from LTC homes across Ontario.  The results of this needs assessment served as support for the Ontario CLRI to formalize an advisory committee and work plan to identify and develop resources to support LTC homes in addressing and welcoming diversity.