Resource Type: Toolkit

Deprescribing.org

A framework and tools for encouraging discussions about deprescribing

Older adults living in long-term care (LTC) homes often take many medications each day – sometimes this is not necessary and can even be harmful. Deprescribing is the planned and supervised process of reducing doses or stopping medications.

Decisions about medications for residents are best made when people work together with their health-care providers. Everyone in an LTC resident’s care team can help make medication-related care safe and effective.

The Bruyère Deprescribing Research Team worked with stakeholders across Ontario’s LTC sector to identify four behaviours and develop supporting tools that help deprescribing become a part of the culture of care. Click on the links in each behaviour to access tools such as process guides, infographics, cue cards and videos:

  1. People living in LTC homes and their families/caregivers will participate in shared decision-making to establish and monitor goals of care with respect to medication use while taking into consideration effectiveness, safety and non-drug alternatives.
  2. All healthcare providers and personnel will observe for signs and symptoms in the people they care for and report changes as a result of medication adjustments, or changes that might prompt a deprescribing review.
  3. Prescribers in every health care setting will document reasons for use, goals and timelines for each medication.
  4. All members of the health care team will participate in conversations about deprescribing.

The Bruyère Deprescribing Research Team is a partner of Ontario CLRI at Bruyère. For more information about how these behaviours were identified, read the Deprescribing in LTC report.

Additional resources and tools for optimizing medication use in older adults
  1. Five evidence-based guidelines that help health care providers make informed assessments of a resident’s medication and explore possibilities for non-drug treatments.
  2. “Talking about Medications” workshops that can be offered to residents, caregivers and staff to help people have discussions about medication decisions. “Talking About Medications” Materials – Deprescribing.org
  3. The Canadian Deprescribing Network raises public awareness about deprescribing and provides resources to address safe drug and non-drug approaches. Do I still need this medication? Is deprescribing for you? (deprescribingnetwork.ca)
Author/Source

Deprescribing.org houses deprescribing guidelines and other resources developed by Dr. Barbara Farrell and Dr. Lisa McCarthy’s research team at the Bruyere Research Institute (Ottawa). Barbara and Lisa are pharmacists who work with older people and are concerned about the risks associated with medications in this population.

To learn more about their work visit deprescribing.org.


Supported by:

Bruyere Logo Deprescribing Logo

Dementia Simulation Toolkit

The Ontario CLRI at Baycrest develops and evaluates innovative educational approaches designed to enhance not only knowledge and skills, but also values and attitudes in learners. With the assistance of interprofessional summer interns, an initial dementia simulation was created and trialed. A final version is presented here in the form of a toolkit. The scripts and resources in this toolkit have evolved over time using a quality improvement approach and are meant to foster participant awareness and insight into living life with frailty and dementia.

This toolkit contains:

  • Information facilitators need to know regarding dementia and dementia
  • Simulation techniques and sample scenarios based on common experiences of the
    elderly in the healthcare system
  • Additional modifications for the scenarios
  • Ideas on how to structure the simulation session for an interprofessional audience,
    including the debrief

As a result, this toolkit will allow users to:

  •  Identify and utilize dementia simulation techniques and scenarios
  • Use these simulations to engage participants in reflection and develop a deeper
    understanding of dementia and frailty

Move to Trash

Dementia Simulation Toolkit 2.0

CHOICE+ Program: Enhancing the Mealtime Experience in Long-Term Care

CHOICE+ is an innovative program that enhances the mealtime experience for residents in long-term care. It focuses on nurturing relationships and creating comfortable dining environments.

Follow CHOICE+ on Instagram for educational content on dining in LTC homes!

The CHOICE+ program is made up of six principles:

  1. Connecting: having meaningful conversations and socializing
  2. Honouring Dignity: respecting decisions, choices and preferences
  3. Offering Support: supporting residents based on individual needs
  4. Identity: knowing and accepting residents as unique individuals
  5. Creating Opportunities: supporting active mealtime participation
  6. Enjoyment: creating a warm and welcoming dining environment

CHOICE+ Resources

CHOICE+ tools are available online, including two self-assessment checklists and six new online learning modules. Teams can use the CHOICE+ tools to:

  • Learn about the CHOICE+ principles and the importance of creating an enjoyable mealtime experience
  • Understand their current strengths in supporting residents at mealtimes
  • Get ideas of simple strategies to try in their day-to-day practice
  • Spark discussion at team meetings and help develop plans for practice change

 

A Guide for Planning and Providing Francophone LTC Services

About the Guide

This guide provides practical advice and tools for how to plan, develop and deliver LTC services for Francophones in the GTA and across Ontario and Canada. The guide is intended for all those involved in planning, advocating for, and providing Francophone health services in Ontario, particularly the LHINs, FLHPEs, FLHNs, health service providers, particularly LTC home administrators and boards, all staff of LTC homes, and Francophone community leaders.

Although the guide is geared toward designing and delivering LTC services in French, the information and tools would be beneficial for other community and residential care models for Francophones as well as services for seniors from other language minority groups.

The development of this guides was a collaborative effort between the French Health Network of Central Southwestern Ontario, Entité 4, Reflet Salvéo, Bendale Acres, the City of Toronto and other regional partners.

End-of-Life Planning and Care Needs of LGBTQI2S Older Adults

About this Resource

The Crossing the Rainbow Bridge resource was created by Egale Canada Human Rights Trust in partnership with the National Seniors Advisory Committee, Maureen Aslin of End of Life Planning Canada, and LGBTQI2S+ community members for LGBTQI2S+ community members. It provides information on how LGBTQI2S+ older adults in Ontario can plan for legal matters and end-of-life care, access guidance for asserting these wishes through legal documents in preparing for end of life, and available resources and supports.

Creating Authentic Spaces Toolkit

About this Toolkit

The Creating Authentic Spaces toolkit is part of The 519’s efforts to challenge transphobia and to foster environments that are inclusive of gender identity and gender expression. People who identify as trans often experience barriers to accessing necessary services due to discrimination or harassment based on their gender identity and gender expression.

This toolkit explores the experiences and challenges faced by trans people and supports organizations and individuals to develop approaches to fostering a trans inclusive environment. The toolkit also highlights the small and larger steps individuals can take personally and within their organizations to create more inclusive spaces and services for trans people. Creating Authentic Spaces info sheets, posters and workshops are also listed on this webpage.

A Serious Game Kit: Trigger Match

A Game to Foster Team Collaboration in the Care of Persons with Dementia

The Baycrest CLRI team along with 2015 summer interns created and trialed a card game called Trigger Match that stimulates team discussion and enhances specific team skills regarding the care of persons with responsive behaviours.

The resources in this toolkit were developed using a quality improvement approach and are meant to foster player and facilitator awareness and insight into working together to find care solutions for long-term care residents with responsive behaviours related to dementia.

Complete Toolkit: Trigger Match Toolkit

Appendix A: Behaviour Cards

Print a ready-to-cut Behaviour Card Deck.

Appendix B: Trigger Cards & Chance Cards

Ready-to-print Trigger and Chance Card Deck.

Appendix C: Behaviours & Trigger Card Blank Templates

Ready-to-print: List of all the behaviours and triggers in an excel sheet, and blank template for the Behaviour and Trigger Cards.

Appendix D: Trigger Match Pocket Card/Cheat Sheet

Ready-to-print Cheat Sheet is meant to be printed double-sided with 6 slides of page 1 and 6 slides on page 2 on a 8.5 ” x 11” sheet. This produces 6 cheat sheets per page.

Appendix E: Sample Presentation/Handout to Introduce the Game

Ready-to-print sample presentation/handout to introduce the game.

 

How to Screen Older Adults for Depression

Education Toolkit: How to Screen Older Adults for Depression using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)

This toolkit is designed as a health professions educational resource for educators seeking to teach healthcare staff and students on using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) to screen older adults for depression in long-term care.  The content of this education places specific emphasis on how to recognize signs and symptoms of depression, how depression is different from dementia, when and how to screen for depression using the PHQ-2, strategies to promote safety and wellness in persons with depression. Experiential learning techniques include the use of video simulations (found in Education Toolkit Part 2-3) for participants to practice and receive feedback using the screening forms. Slides, handouts and evaluation materials are also included for adaptation and use by the educator.

 

 

How to Screen Older Adults for Delirium

Education Toolkit: How to Screen Older Adults for Delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM)

This toolkit is designed as a health professions education resource for educators seeking to teach healthcare staff and students on using the CAM to screen older adults for delirium in long-term care. The content of this education places specific emphasis on how to recognize signs and symptoms of delirium, when and how to screen for delirium using the CAM, and strategies to promote safety and wellness in people with delirium. Experiential learning techniques include the use of video simulations (found in Education Toolkit Part 2-3) for participants to practice and receive feedback using the screening forms. Slides, handouts, and evaluation materials are also included for adaptation and use by the educator.