Resources: Learning

How to Screen Older Adults for Delirium

  • Resource Type: Toolkit, Video
  • Posted On: April 28, 2016
  • Author/Source: Baycrest
  • Audience(s): Academics, Educators, Leaders & Managers

Education Toolkit: How to Screen Older Adults for Delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM)

This toolkit is designed as a health professions education resource for educators seeking to teach healthcare staff and students on using the CAM to screen older adults for delirium in long-term care. The content of this education places specific emphasis on how to recognize signs and symptoms of delirium, when and how to screen for delirium using the CAM, and strategies to promote safety and wellness in people with delirium. Experiential learning techniques include the use of video simulations (found in Education Toolkit Part 2-3) for participants to practice and receive feedback using the screening forms. Slides, handouts, and evaluation materials are also included for adaptation and use by the educator.

How to Screen Older Adults for Delirium (Toolkit Part 1 of 4)

Screening forms, slides, handouts, and evaluation materials.

How to Screen Older Adults for Delirium (Toolkit Part 2 of 4)

In Delirium Video Simulation 1 you will meet Sam Smith, a 70-year old male currently admitted to a rehabilitation unit after knee replacement surgery a week ago. Mr. Smith has a history of stroke, osteoarthritis, and glaucoma and uses a cane to help him ambulate. He is usually a very pleasant, cheerful and cooperative client who gets along well with everyone, especially his unit roommate. A couple of days ago, his scheduled pain medications were revised and he received the first dose this morning. Please watch and follow the case while scoring the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM).

How to Screen Older Adults for Delirium (Toolkit Part 3 of 4)

In Delirium Video Simulation 2 you will meet Mrs. George, an 80-year old female widow living in a nursing home for three years and one of her two daughters, who visits every Saturday. Mrs. G. is a very pleasant and sociable lady, who likes attending the daily music groups and taking part in baking activities. She particularly enjoys meal times and sees this as an opportunity to mingle with co-residents. Mrs. George has Diabetes Type 2 (controlled), hypertension (controlled) osteoarthritis, uses a walker occasionally and wears glasses. Please watch and follow the case while scoring the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM).

How to Screen Older Adults for Delirium (Toolkit Part 4 of 4)

In Delirium Video Simulation 3 you will meet Henry Ford, a 70-year old male, who has been living in a nursing home for two years. He has a history of chronic urinary tract infections (UTIs) and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Henry is a very pleasant and sociable man who usually takes part in the daily music group. He loves singing with co-residents. Please watch and follow the case while scoring the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM).

Your Feedback Matters

Your feedback is valued and allows us to improve our resources available to those working and living in long-term care. Please take a minute to fill out the following form:

Resource Feedback Form

Related Resources

About the Ontario Centres for Learning, Research and Innovation in Long-Term Care

The Ontario CLRI is funded by the Ministry of Health, and the Ministry of Long-Term Care, and hosted at Baycrest Health Sciences, Bruyère, and the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging.

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy

  • Baycrest logo

    Baycrest Health Sciences is a global leader in geriatric residential living, healthcare, research, innovation and education, with a special focus on brain health and aging.

    Visit Baycrest

  • Bruyère logo

    Maximizing quality of life and helping people stay and return home, Bruyère offers a variety of services in aging and rehabilitation, medically complex, palliative, residential and primary care.

    Visit Bruyère

  • RIA

    The Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA) is an innovation catalyst. By advancing research, education and practice, the RIA enhances quality of life and care for older adults everywhere.

    Visit RIA